Buescher Keilwerth (Couf, other stencils) Selmer(Paris)
Buffet King Selmer(USA) Omega - AS/TS100
Cleveland Martin W.T. Armstrong
Conn   Yamaha
Couf (Royalist II)   Yanagisawa
     

Any links will bring up pictures of past horn repair work, sold, inventory, personal horns or pictures from eBay.

Buescher    [ Back to Top]

Years and Serial Numbers are approximate

Year Serial Number  
1905 5000  
1906 5620  
1907 6610  
1908 7808  
1909 8580  
1910 11250  
1911 13685  
1912 15870  
1913 18178  
1914 22860  
1915 25103
 (Union Label)
1916 28875  
1917 32350  
1918 37540  
1919 46975  
1920 61255  
1921 78525  
1922 99275  
1923 125750  
1924 150250  
1925 175275  
1926 202350  
1927 222175  
1928 235250  
1929 245250  
1930 255275  
1931 260125 2627xx start New Aristocrat production (1931-1934)
1932 264025 2641xx New Aristocrat Alto
1933 265523 2662xx Silver Plated New Aristocrat Tenor
1934 267356 267xxx end New Aristocrat production (1931-1934)
267xxx start Aristocrat Series I production (1934-1940)
1935 268971  
1936 272896  
1937 279300  
1938 284418  
1939 288024  
1940 291336 291xxx end Aristocrat Series I production (1934-1940)
291xxx start Aristocrat "Big B" production (1940-1955)
1941 294125 295xxx start 'Top Hat and Cane' 400 model (1941-1955)
1942 297527  
1948 312000  
1949 316000  
1950 326000 331xxx start Aristocrat Series II (1950-1955)
1951 337000  
1952 347000  
1955 350000 3513xx Top Hat & Cane alto
355xxx end Aristocrat "Big B" production (1940-1955)
357xxx end Aristocrat Series II (1950-1955)
357xxx start Aristocrat Series III (1955-1963)
359xxx end  'Top Hat and Cane' 400 model (1941-1955)
359xxx start S5, S25 400 Model (1955-1963)
1960 360000  
1963 381000 381xxx end Aristocrat Series III (1955-1963)
381xxx end  S5, S25 400 Model (1955-1963)
381xxx Around this time Selmer(USA) Purchased Buescher
1965 408000  
1970 520000  
1975 630000  
1980 785000  
1983 875000  
     

[Back to Top]


Buffet [Back to Top]

Buffet Saxophone Serial Number List

 Date  Serial Number  
1952 2925-3114  
1953 3115-3389  
1954 3390-3762  
1955 3763-4225  
1956 4226-4816  
1957 4817-5391  
1958 5392-6171  
1959 6172-6807  
1960 6808-7415  
1961 7416-8655  
1962 8656-9668  
1963 9669-10063  
1964 10064-11748  
1965 11749-12777  
1966 12778-13765  
1967 13766-14486  
1968 14487-15346  
1969 15347-16322  
1970 16323-17318  
1971 17319-18444  
1972 18445-19786  
1973 19787-21440  
1974 21441-22686  
1975 22687-24416  
1976 24417-26150  
1977 26151-27279  
1978 27280-28732  
1979 28733-30189  
1980 30190-31538  
1981 31539-32960  
1982 32961-33923  
1983 33924-34663  
1984 34664-35732  
1985 35733  
    Buffet started to be a Keilwerth stencil.

[ Back to Top]


Cleveland [ Back to Top]

Year Serial#  
1925 1  
1930 10  
1935 30  
1940 40  
1945 45  
1950 50  
1955 56  
1960 100  
1965 160  
1970 420  
1975 600  

 

[ Back to Top]


Conn [ Back to Top]

Conn Saxophone Serial Number List Years and Serial Numbers are approximate
Date Serial Number 
1895 1 
1896 2,000 
1897 2,500 
1898 3,000 
1899 3,500 
1900 3,900 
1901 4,400 
1902 5,100 
1903 6,700 
1904 8,500 
1905 9,600 
1906 10,800 
1907 12,000 
1908 13,000 
1909 15,400 
1910 17,800 
1911 21,200 
1912 22,500 - Conn Royal Artist stencil with RH G# trill, forked E key
1913 25,000 
1914 30,000 
1916 35,000 
1917 40,000 
1919 50,000 Conn C-Melody tenor
1920 58,000 
1921 64,000 
1922 83,000 
1923 101,775 
1924 124,600 
1925 145,400 
1926 167,900 
1927 193,450 
1928 209,250 
1929 224,600 
1930 237,800 
1931 244,700 
1932 249,230 
1933 256,501 
1934 260,000 
1935 263,500 
1936 271,000 
1937 278,000 
1938 284,000 
1939 285,000 
1940 288,300 
1941 295,250 
1942 304,500 
1943 309,250 
1944 309,300 
1945 310,200 
1946 314,000 
1947 320,000 
1948 327,150 
1949 332,150 
1950 337,250 
1951 341,850  
1952 341,851  
1953  354,742 
1954   359,251  
1955 500,001 
1956  571,750  
1957 652,002 
1958 718,626 
1959  779,657  
1960  834200 
1961 898556 
1962 949465  
1963 C00S0l  
1964 C73854  
1965 E54106  
1966 H31247  
1967 K35274  
1968 L20454  
1969 "M"-Pretix  
1970 "N"-Prefix Nogales Mexico - this was the largest quality decline of Conn.  Horns after this period are not highly sought after
1971 "P"-Prefix 
1972 "R"-Prefix  
1976 83000-89496 
1977 91314-98992  
1978  98993-111820 
1979 111821-128691 
1980 128692-145001 
1981 145002-154753 
1982 154954-170073 
1983 170074-184336  
1984 184337-201207 -an anomoly, the Conn 21M with full lacquer - Basic Pro model -  is a fabulous sounding horn, though has few followers. I personally think that Conn imported this body from France, but no body markings or other information is known, thus highly doubtful. But if you ever get a chance to play one of these horns do it, you will not be disappointed by the huge tone.
1985 201208-221243 
1986 221244-240141 
1987 240142-261465 
1988  261466-273178 3811713-3821881
1989 3900000  
1990 4000000  
1991 4100000  

Note: From 1987, the prefix number plus 50 gives you the year of manufacture.

Conn DJH 90M soprano

 

[Back to Top]


King [Back to Top]

The following information was compiled from serial number records which were not complete. Because of this, it is to be used as a guide or rough estimate of when a King or Cleveland model instrument was manufactured. It does not pertain to those models which were marketed under the Gladiator, American Standard, or other trademarks.

The popular King Super 20 (may also have H.N. White engraving) differed greatly in tone over the years. Super 20's were made with brazed-on toneholes until the early 1970's (the same way Martins were). This allowed the metal thickness to be uniformed for each tone hole and now thinness in the body tubes. The later horns were made in Japan with drawn toneholes. These later horns apparently sounded much different from earlier models and have a brighter tone.

Date Serial Number 
1893-1915 1-50,000  
1915-1925 50,000-78,000 
1925-193078,001-126,000 
1930-1935126,001-161,000  
1935-1940161,001-220,000 
1940-1945220,001-275,000 
1945-1950275,001-305,000 
1950-1955305,001-340,000 
1955-1960340,001-370,000 
1960-1965370,001-406,500 
1965-1970406,501-457,600 
1970-1975457,601-511,750 
1975-1980511,751- 

[ Back to Top]


Martin [ Back to Top]

Apparently some of the Martin brothers worked for York in Battle Creek, Michigan USA. After which they struck out on their own in 1904 and founded "The Martin Band Instrument Company".

Their father, John Martin,  started the original "The Martin Company" in 1865 in Chicago.  Martin was an immigrant from Germany in that year. In 1871 the factory was destroyed by fire. And in 1871 he moved to Elkhart, Indiana and became one of the original workers, the 6th employee, to work for C.G. Conn.

Their saxophones are very distinctive as they have soldered on toneholes. The toneholes were fairly thick compared to regular drawn toneholes and they were also beveled. The horns are best repadded with rivet or rivetless pads for a smooth & darker tone.

Handcraft Troudador - From 1930 to 1933, 100,xxx to 110,xxx

Handcraft Imperial - from 1933 to 1935, 107,xxx to 114,xxx. LH table keys changed from a vertical Selmer mk VI style to 3 plate horizontal configuration.

A Handcraft Standard and Handcraft Standard Special was considered an Intermediate/Pro horn. Very little is really known about it other than it was sprinkled throughout a few years Handcraft production. Plastic RH pinky rollers. No Eb vent key. Considered a non-pro alternative such as the Yamaha 62 versus the Yamaha 875. At least from 111,xxx to 141,xxx, 1935 to approx 1938.

 

Magna - from 1956 to 1971, 200,xxx to 350,xxx

Other models: Indiana, Imperial, Medalist

Even today you can find new horns labeled Martin, though they are Asian made and have no resemblence to the original Martin instruments.  In 1971 LeBlanc purchased the rights to Martin and resold Yanigasawa saxophones under the Martin brand.

                 

Date Serial NumberDescription (underlined items are links to pictures)
1919/12/08 17,221Handcraft Pro models (1905 to approx 1929) The

original Handcraft Pro was a solidly built horn with split bell keys, RH G# Trill key, and no front high F key.  Early models had minimal engraving whereas later models had fairly significant and decorative engraving. One the last Pro models had a front F key.

1920/11/0119,482 
1921/12/2923,781 
1922/08/1029,942 
1923/05/0134,838 
1924/01/0140,644 
1925/01/0148,489 
1926/01/0167,852 
1927/01/0179,254 
1928/01/0186,687 
1929/01/0192,536Typewriter - From 1929 to 1930, 95xxx to 100,xxx
1930/01/0698,324 
1931/01/01101,622 
1932/01/04105,096 
1933/02/06106,546 
1934/01/01108,301 
1935/03/01111,253Committee (I) - from 1935 to 1938, 114,xxx to 125,xxx
1936/09/01116,551 
1937/01/05118,038 
1938/09/01126,998Committee II - from 1938 to 1945, 125,xxx to 150,xxx

Example of a Comm II Alto 130xxx stamped "Low Pitch"

1939/09/01132,070 
1940/09/01136,040 
1941/09/01140,199 
1942/09/01144,455Centenial - from 1942 to 1943, 141,xxx to 145,xxx
1943/01/21145,322 
1945/07/26145,352The Martin (ALTO or TENOR) - from 1945 to 1971, 150,xxx to 350,xxx. 
Start of the rounded edge rectangle LH table keys. LH bell keys, wire
guards, multi-wire bell brace, wire bow key guards.
1946/07/23154,289 
1947/07/22161,520 
1948/07/23165,326 
1949/07/20170,395 
1950/01/05172,215 
1951/01/16 175,140 
1952/01/02179,317 
1953/01/05183,125 
1954/01/04187,614 
1955/05/10193,747 
1956/01/01196,213 
1957/11/04 201,917 
1958/02/03203,809 
1959/01/28205,377 
1960/12/02209,089 
1961/12/13211,675 
1962/07/01213,999 
1963/01/08218,855  

[ Back to Top]


Selmer(Paris) [ Back to Top]

Selmer Serial #s may overlap models and years. Use it as an estimate.

Year Model Serial Number

Model 22
1922  750-1400
1923  1401-2350
1924  2351-3350
1925  3351-4450
Selmer's first saxophone (some available with the Adolphe name) made between 1922 and 1925. This horn had a small bore which, theoretically, suited the style of music in the early 1900s. The early models had no high F key and were keyed to high Eb. Interestingly enough some had double octave mechanisms while other only went down to low B.  Interestingly enough, the early Model 22s had the Right Hand Trill G# and other interesting alternative keywork.  Selmer also had available a fully curved soprano sax.
  • Early British imported horns were stamped "Modele 1922" with the name of the British Agent also stamped on the bell "J R Lafleur & Son Ltd which was a division of Boosey & Hawkes.The serial number is No 1143 which dates from the year 1922.

  • They made a full range of saxophones:Sopranos,Altos,Tenors,C Melodies and Eb Baritones. They were all stamped with the Henri Selmer Signature and with the address' 4 Place Dancourt Paris'

  • Some were heavily engraved but most were not. They were available in Silver,Gold lacquer and Gold plate
  • 1922 models also included C Melody variations.

 

Model 26
1926  4451-5600
1927  5601-7850
1928  7851-9700
1929  9701-11950
One version of the Model 26 only went up to high E and had two right hand side keys.  Left hand table keys were mk VI soprano type with a round pearl G#.  Pictures of Model 26 from Selmer
"Cigar Cutter"/"Super Sax"
1930  11951-14000
1931 14001-15750
1932  15751-17250
1933  17251-18700
 
"Radio Improved
1934  18701-20100
1935  20101-21750
The Radio Improved was the first version where the lye holder was part of the socket area. The saxes still had wire key guards.  Pictures of Radio Improved from Selmer
"Balanced Action"
1936  21751-22650
1937  22651-25600
1938  25601-27650
1939  27651-29300
1940  29301-29750
1941  29751-30500
1942  30501-31150
1943  31151-31580
1944  31581-31850
1945  31851-32350
1946  32351-33700
1947  33701-35800
3 Version of the Balanced Action - commonly known as BA

21751-24999 - The inline action had adjusting screws including to adjust he middle D which the early Selmers had slight problems with. These horns also had two separate low B & Bb bell key guards. The Bell was inline (most saxophones of this era were inline).

25000-26999 - The Bell had a slight offset with one piece guard on the Bell keys. Pictures of a 1938 model w/lower stack stopper that were the posts  No pant guard.  Full lower stack screw adjusters which stopped against the posts.

27000-35800 - These models are the most sought after from 1939. Production was ceased at the beginning of World War II but was resumed after the war. Some models had black finger pearls due to the shortage of mother or pearl.

The Balanced Action brought many improvements which included the "modern design non-articulating" right hand table keys; the adjusters on the Bbis and G# keys and its adjusting arm.

1947 Selmer had a Jimmy Dorsey model

"Super Action"
1948  35801-38500
1949  38501-41500
1950  41501-45100
1951  45101-48300
1952  48301-51800
1953  51801-55200
Commonly known as SBA, or Super Balanced Action.
"Mark VI"
1954  55201-59000
1955  59001-63400
1956  63401-68900
1957  68901-74500
1958  74501-80400
1959  80401-85200
1960  85201-91300
1961  91301-97300
1962  97301-104500
1963  104501-112500
1964  112501-121600
1965  121601-131800
1966  131801-141500
1967  141501-152400
1968  152401-162500
1969  162501-173800
1970  173801-184900
1971  184901-196000
1972  196001-208700
1973  208701-220800
Selmer mk VI advertisements from Selmer

Altos - early VIs (pre 80k) had small neck openings making them fairly resistance and a fairly focused tone.

Altos - around 80k through 90k the neck opening was increased until the sound got bigger, brighter and fuller.  The resistance decreased.  This era VI is a favorite because of their overall flexibility in their compact sound with a good control for the level of  resistance.

Altos - 105k - Change in the neck bore and neck ring design. Horns have a harsher, brighter tone.  Good Vis can have the qualities of a 90k or 140k VI though the "not-so-good-ones" can be termed as sounding like a "buzz-saw".  production shortcuts led to sloppier action with heavier spring tensions to compensate.

Altos - 130K

"Mark VII"
1974  220801-233900  M tubes
1975  233901-246800
1976  246801-261100
1977  261101-276100
1978  276101-289700  N tubes
1979  289701-303100  
1980  303101-315500
"Mark VII" (sopranos & baritones were still sold as mk VI)

1976 Selmer mk VII tenor w/engraving

1979 Selmer mk VII alto

"Super Action 80"
1981  315501-327300
1982  327301-340200
1983  340201-353300
1982 SA80 Tenor
"Super Action 80" (sopranos & baritones apparently were still mk VIs, per say, with modern keywork)
"Super Action 80 Series I"
1984  353301-366400
1985  366401-378800 
 
"Super Action 80/Series II"
1986  378801-391000
1987  391001-406000
1988  406001-422500
1989  422501-439600
1990  439601-457500
1991  457501-473600
1992  473601-490000
1993  486000-497000
1994  497000 507000
Selmer Series II tenor (547xxx)
Selmer introduced the Spring loaded keywork back in 1980ish with the Super Action 80.  This is basically a spring and a piece of rod inserted into the keywork to always keep the keywork tight with no slop that normally exists with wear.  This slug is on both top and bottom of the keywork.  For example on a Series II N392xxx, the slug is in:

LEFT HAND SLUGS
Thumb lever
A key
Bbis
Pinky G#
Pinky A
Pinky low B
Pinky low Bb
RIGHT HAND SLUGS
side high F# pad rod and finger touch rod
side high E
Side F#
side Bb
side C
Pinky Eb

Series 3 introduced
1995  504000-515000
1996  515000-529000
1997  529000-545000
1998  545000-560000
1999  560000-580000

Reference 36/54 Introduced
2000  580000-595000

2001  595001- 615000

 
  Super Action 80
1981 315501 - 327300 – 11,799 pieces made
1982 327301 - 340200 – 12,899
1983 340201 - 353300 – 13,099
1984 353301 - 366400 – 13,099
1985 366401 - 378800 – 12,399 Selmer list ends

Super Action 80/Serie II
1986 378,801 - 391,000 – 12,199 pieces made
1987 391,001 - 406,000 – 14,999
1988 406,001 - 422,500 – 16,499
1989 422,501 - 439,600 – 17,099
1990 439,601 - 457,500 – 17,899
1991 457,501 - 473,600 – 16,099
1992 473,601 - 490,000 – 16,399 Selmer list ends

Super Action 80 serie III
1995-1996 - 507,000-514,999 - 7,999 pieces made
1996-1997 - 515,000-528,999 - 13,999
1997-1998 - 529,000-544,999 - 15,999
1998-1999 - 545,000-559,999 - 14,999
1999-2000 - 560,000-579,999 - 19,999
2000-2001 - 580,000-594,999 - 14,999 Selmer list ends

Reference
2000-2001 - 580,000-594,999

1993 - 490,104 - eBay seller - purchased in 1994
____ - 491,871 - eBay seller - purchased in 1993
1994 - 500,**** - SOTW member - DXCamp
1995 - 538,175 - anon reader - purchased 1995
____ - 538,254 - SOTW member BrianTheHornman SA80 II alto
1996
1997 - 549,317 - anon reader - purchased 1997
1998 - 566,734 - eBay seller
____ - 573,690 - CraigsList seller - purchased 1998
1999 -
2000 -
2001 - 589,423 - anon reader - purchased in 2003
2002 - 607,322 - Ebay seller - Serie III
____ - 612,678 - eBay seller - purchased 2002
____ - 612,971 - eBay seller - purchased late 2002
____ - 613,355 - eBay seller
____ - 613,717 - SOTW member - drakesaxprof -
____ - 613,861 - SOTW member - Vitruvius-new/used orig purchase -2004
2003 - 620,952 - SaxQuest seller - Serie III - purchased 2003
2004 - 656,**** - SOTW member - bartonsax - Serie II Bari
____ - 658,254 - eBay seller - purchased 2004
____ - 660,552 - eBay seller - purchased 10/24/04
____ - 660,987 - anon reader - purchased 6/18/04
____ - 661,77x - Ebay seller - new/old stock from 2004
2005
2006 - 696,**** - SOTW member - REF696
2007
2008 - 718,**** - anon reader
2009
Any contributions to this list is appreciated - Thank you.......

1996 - Series III soprano

1997 - Series III tenor

1998 - Signature Series

Vintage Selmer Paris Saxophone Models

Selmer saxophones were introduced as the "Modele 22", in 1922.
Updated, though still with very small bores, the "Modele 26", in 1926.
The famous "Cigar Cutter" models were made for only 4 years, 1930-1933.
The "Radio Improved" and "Selmer Super Sax" (SSS) were similar to the Cigar Cutter, with the Cigar Cutter removed. These were made until 1935.
The "Balanced Action" were the first Selmer  saxophones with the offset keywork. Selmer introduced them in 1935 and made about 10,000 of them.
The "Super Balanced Action" followed and was built from 1948 until 1954.  It is said that they play similar to the later Mk. VI's which were smaller and required less from the player, but still they possessed the "Selmer Sound".
The World Famous Selmer Mark VI alto and tenor saxes were made from 1954 until 1973, Mark VI sopranos and baritones continued until the "S.A. 80".
The short lived Mark 7 altos and tenors, were made from 1974 until 1979.
The "Super Action 80" saxes were introduced in 1980 and were upgraded to "Super Action 80, Series II" in 1986.  They are now, well into "Series III".
Additionally, they now have a "Reference'35" and "Reference'54", which are the bore tapers of the 1935 Balanced Action and 1954 Mark VI, using the hole    placement (improved intonation) and key work (stronger and more ergonomic) of the latest Series III units currently in production.

Henri Selmer was born in 1858, the 10th child, to Charles-Frederic Selmer.  At a young age he quickly showed a gift for the clarinet.  In 1877 he entered the Paris Conservatory and went to Mr. Leroy's clarinet class. He quickly became Mr. Rosse's pupil.

In 1880, at the time he finished the Conservatory, he began his real musical career and was appointed to the French Republican Guard.  Later he was named a solo clarinetist in the Opera Conique Orchestra. He was also playing at the Lamoureux Orchestra and had many concerts with those organizations all over France and Europe.

In 1885 (being married with a family) he decided to start manufacturing clarinet reeds and mouthpieces. He was quickly successful and started reaching the general public.  In the late 1800s he started clarinet manufacturing an gave up his musical career.

His brother Alexandre had a significant impact on importing saxophones to the US and in his Paris production of clarinets.  His son Maurice and two son in laws assisted in developing and opening the company to other instruments and markets.

Henri Selmer passed away in 1941.

[ Back to Top]


Selmer(USA) Pro Saxophones   [ Back to Top]

(2012)  Conn-Selmer is the newest entity in merger's of the musical instrument industry.   It is a merger of Conn and Selmer.

(my text from 2001) Selmer (USA) today imports and distributes Henri Selmer-Paris horns.  They are two entities with one very close past.  Alexandre Selmer, who is famous in the US (and shortly Paris) for his line of Alexandre clarinets came to the US and joined many renowned orchestras.  He later started the Selmer USA company in 1904 to import his brothers line of saxophones to the US (Henri Selmer).  Alexandre then hired George M. Bundy (a former student of his) to run the business and Alexandre went back to Paris to show his brother how to make clarinets. Thus his Alexandre clarinets were briefly made in Paris until they were discountinued.  His design of clarinets quickly made Selmer clarinets a leading and wanted brand.

FYI, some older Selmer USA horns had H&A on them.  H&A stood for Henri & Alexandre.

Bundy Specials

This line of Bundy horns has a professional heritage.  They were precursors to the famous H. Couf line of horns.  The specific model was H&A Selmer Bundy Specials and designed by Herbert Couf.  Please see Bundy in the Couf/Keilwerth section.

Selmer USA in the early 1980s introduced a line of Professional saxophones.  Initially identified as the Omega 162 (Alto) and 164 (Tenor), then later the AS100 (AS = Alto Sax) and TS100 (TS = Tenor Sax), and then the AS110 and TS110 models.

Model Omega 162/164

Selmer(USA) Omega line of alto and tenor saxophones were superb professional instruments rivaling the Selmer(Paris) line.  They have distinctly full bell engraving and may or may not say "Omega" on them, these are late 1970's and early 1980's models.  Later Omega horns have less bell engraving and are not as desireable for Selmer USA horns, though they are excellent intermediate horns.  Key indicators are the neck. If the neck support is a think 'beam' type it is the later model. If it is the type similar to Paris horns it is the desireable model; also the engraving is much more extensive on the earlier models.  Anything with model number including MG is not their earlier pro horn..

From the early 1980s until approximately 2001 Selmer USA made their top-of-the-line saxes in Elkhart, Indiana. the The Model  162 Omega alto sax was the first model introduced. 

The Model 164 was the first tenor introduced around serial number 823000 (notice the lack of the "Omega" title. The model designation was changed to either TS100 or TS-100 when it was realized that professional players were not buying this "pro" line.  The AS110 and TS110 started having corners cut to lower cost.  Later horns used a different numbering sequence starting with 1xxxxxx (1 million +).

The early saxes had a dark lacquer and many Selmer Paris mk VI keywork styling. Later horns had brighter lacquer reminiscent of the Selmer Super Action 80 and late mk VIIs.  Earlier horns had a brass high F#, later models had a pearl high F#.

Ads

The Omega Model

Serial Number ranges:  820xxx through 823xxx  (need confirmation) 
All of these early horns were apparently hand soldered like their Paris cousins.  Later models (100s & 110s) horns used more automated procedures such as induction soldering and less precise key fittings.

Notice the round RH side F# pearl, ovalized pearl high F#.  The Body/Bell brace is distinctively mk VII and not mk VI.  This design was carried forward to the SA80.  The neck strap loop is distinctively thin compared to Paris.  The RH side keys are distinctly mk VII like.  The pearl touches are smaller than Paris.

Serial number usually in 820xxx.  1983 a serial # was reported to be 821xxx

Engraving:  Notice the engraving is only around the emblem.  No engraving on the bell front nor bow.
Emblem:  The emblem is a stamp.


SN 820425 ALTO
Viisual: a
Engraving: Very nice engraving on the bell only.
Emblem:  The "Selmer" looks engraved whereas the Restricted and USA are stamped


Below SN 821105 ALTO (from eBay)
Visual Modifications: a.  


SN 823594 ALTO (from eBay)
Visual Modifications:  ..
Engraving: The engraving is very nice floral on the bell only.  No engraving on the bow
Emblem:

Tenor (from eBay)

SN - not sure
VISUAL:  The RH F# is a round pearl, and the altissimo F# is a rectangular metal key
ENGRAVING: The engraving


The AS/TS 100 Model

Serial Number ranges:  824xxx through 829xxx  (need confirmation). 
TS100 example:  829xxx (better pictures coming soon)
Engraving: Notice the engraving is not only around the emblem, but all around the bell and front part of the bow.
Emblem: The Emblem is engraved, not stamped.

 

The AS/TS 110 Model

Serial Numbers:  83xxxx and higher, Later models have a neck brace and 7 digit serial numbers.

Identifiable by the elongated pearl RH alternative F# key; the bent brass high F# key and the AS/TS110 stamp on the bell.  Also notice the neck stiffener under the neck which is smooth and does not have a crease like the Paris horns.

At this point Selmer USA lowers the overall quality of the instrument.  The neck socket uses a cheaper version with the music lyre being separate about 3 inches lower.


ALTO Pictures taken from eBay (7/2012)
Engraving: Some engraving above the emblem, on the front of the bell and bow.  This engraving is a bit more simplistic than earlier engraving such as the 100 model.
Emblem:  The emblem is stamped with the "AS110" model number.  I need to see more specimens as I'm curious if maybe the altos were stamped and the tenors were engraved.
Visual Modifications: Right hand alt F# pearl is elongated like the mk VII - this modification makes it easier to hit the F# touch.

Below SN: 830875

 


Now sold as an intermediate horn

Below SN: 184834

 

 

early 80s                 828xx tenor  

late 80's/early 90s    820011 - 1288792  alto

Modified Design - later Omegas Good Design - early Omegas

Signet "S" Brace

Selmer USA made a version of the Signet which was basically a Buescher 400 (after they purchased Buescher - the 400 line included 'TOp Hat and Cane'; S5 & S25 models).  This is a fantastic horn with a nice full tone and warmth..  It is mainly identifiable by the "S" shaped bell brace.  Earlier models had ornate flower motif engraving, later ones no engraving.

Signet were serial numbers 381xxx and later

1963 381000
1965 408818
1970 520000
1975 630000
1980 785000
1983 875000

The Bundy came from the Buescher Aristocrat, basically the Buescher Big B was the "mold" for the Bundy.  Same keywork, design, etc.

[ Back to Top]


Keilwerth    [ Back to Top]

Click here to jump directly to the [  Soprano comparison ]  [  Alto and Tenor comparison ]

192: 0-800  
1947 20,000  
1953 23,000  
1958 28,000  
1960 38,000 New King Tenor - acrylic key guard
1962 43,000  
1964 49,000  
1966 55,000  
1971 69,000 2nd Generation 62xx Couf Tenor with seesaw F# ad high F# combo
1978 79,000 earlier Couf tenor example
later Couf alto Black Nickel example
later Couf alto lacquer example
1986 91,000 84xxx Armstrong Heritage Tenor w/3 point key guards
Couf Sopranos
Couf Superba II tenor

For a short period Conn imported a horn with the designation "Conn DJH". Conn DJH horns were an improvement over the Couf design while Coufs were still being produced. It had a Selmer type octave key, Tilting Bb left hand table keys and a few other minor improvements.
After 1989 Ponzol redesigned the Keilwerth Tenor horns and had a line of his own tenors.  These models had true Rolled Tone Holes, removeable bow/body ring and improved intonation, 3 point key guards.

1993 99,100
Around 100,000 Keilwerth went away from true Rolled Tone Holes and started using Tone Hole Rings which are soldered on regular tone holes.
1998 109,000  

Keilwerth Stencils:

Couf Superba 1 & 2 (see information below) (Armstrong) Royalist, Royalist I Heritage (Armstrong) Conn DJH Buffet Edgeware Marco Vincent Albert (1960's) Martelle Winsall Bundy Special (1960's) King Tempo Champion Calvert Deluxe

Mr. Herbert Couf, President of W.T. Armstrong group during the 1970s and 1980s had the Couf Superbas and Royalist/Armstrong/heritage line of saxophones all from Keilwerth. Some of which were sold as a competing model. Royalist II and many Armstrong (like the model 3200) saxes were strictly a student line made in Elkhart as a Reverse-engineered Keilwerth Royalist to reduce the cost. Mr. Couf also owned Royal Music Store in Royal Oak, Michigan until 1989. I believe he now owns a home on a local Golf Course.

Also, the engineering group for Mr. Couf made improvements on the Keilwerth design.  Gary Ferree (of Ferree tools, RIP) was instrumental in improving the RH alt F# key.  It was the seesaw type and he redesigned it to the side type.  This also allowed the altissimmo F# keytouch to be redesigned.

Amati, Dörfler & Jörka copied Keilwerths (1949 to 1968, then purchased by Keilwerth) and B&S

The earlier Keilwerth, alto, soprano and tenor all had metal thumbrests. Late model sopranos and altos had plastic thumbrests. The plastic thumbrest had a 2 point connection. This prevented breaking which apparently was a problem on Selmer horns at that time.

Superba 1s  (see below for a better description and pictures)
- have Rolled Tone Holes throughout the range of saxes, except for the Soprano.
- has an elegant, soldered, bell brace
- full bell & bow engraving
- lyre holder part of mouthpipe socket clamp mechanism (except soprano)
- neck upper octave key made from thick square brass rod
- Bow soldered directly to bow via an expanded section. Bow soldered directly to body via an expanded section.
No rings were used to combine the sections.
- early superba 1s do not have a high F# key. mid-early Superba 1s have a high F# key.
- early and mid-early superba 1 & 2s have a RH see-saw type F# key. later Superba 1 & 2s have a levered F# key.
- All post to body construction (no ribs)
- Early saxes had a removeable metal thumbrest. Late model sopranos and altos had plastic thumbrests. The plastic thumbrest had a 2 point connection. This prevented breaking which apparently was a problem on Selmer horns at that time.

Superba 2s
- have straight tone holes throughout the range of saxes plus the Superba 1 soprano.
- single rod bell brace
- bell engraving
- lyre holder soldered on separately below the mouthpipe socket sleeve
- neck upper octave key made from round brass wire
- Bow soldered directly to bow via and expanded section. Bow soldered directly to body via an expanded section.
No rings were used to combine the sections.
- early and mid-early superba 1 & 2s have a RH see-saw type F# key. later Superba 1 & 2s have a levered F# key.
- all post to body construction (no ribs)
- all thumbrests were metal and soldered in a permanent position on the body.

Superba 1s, it is said, have a more mellow and lush sound than Superba 2s due to the RTH vs non-RTH. This apparently keeps the stacks stiffer and parts of the body resonates less.
The Superba 2s supposedly have a more cutting sound similiar to Selmers of the time.
Both horns had oversized concave pearls that are very comfortable.
Non articulating low Bb keywork, but very fast and functional mechanisms.

For a few years the Superbas were available in black lacquer.  The engraving was done after the lacquer which provided a stunning visual affect of being able to see the engraving from a distance. This models had metal thumbrests and were probably late 70's models.

Both Superba 1 & 2s were considered Pro models.

H&A Selmer imported an early version of this horn before it became a Couf. These were H&A Selmer Bundy Special horns. Visually identifiable by the RTH (Rolled Tone Holes) and 2 point Bow & Bell Guards with mostly plastic pant leg guards.

H.Genet Roxy Jubilee Voss Rene Dumont

Keilwerth family relatives: Max Keilwerth and Richard Keilwerth (Graslitz) made saxes under the names: Weltklang (baritones only) Senator Hohner

 

Conn DJH horns were Couf Superba Is and 2s. Rebadged, available in silver plate or lacquer.

Available in the late 1980s before Conn was sold to UMI

Keilwerth EX model line - the EX line can be a very good horn, all depending which model you purchase - the eaarlier ones being made in Germany.

Model Made in
EX90         Germany
EX90 II Germany
EX90 III Czech Republic
ST 90 I Germany
ST 90 II and III Czech Republic
ST 90 IV Taiwan (Jupiter)

Thought I would update this 2/2012 a bit as it is dated and jumbled

Early Couf Alto - no high F#, seesaw alt RH F# and a see through plastic pant guard- SN56462

Sopranos  
Early sopranos had the "inline" mk VI type palm keys.

click on picture for full page

The G# key originally was black plastic, later to be a pearl.  The RH side F# originally was rectangularish metal, later to be a round pearl. 

The mk VI style palm keys later were changed to more conventional palm keys.

The Superba Is & IIs originally had the same amount of engraving.  The only difference between the early ones was the II had a fixed thumbrest versus an adjustable metal thumbrest and engraved "II" instead of "I".  The models would later add a high F# usually as a longer lever above the side F#. 

Later on the Superba Is had a little more engraving and a twin point raised plastic thumbrest (improved from the adjustable metal thumbrest) versus the still fixed metal thumbrest of the IIs.  Other than that most features followed each other. 

Couf Sopranos had no rolled toneholes.  The early ones may not of had neckstrap rings.  The Superba 1 neckstrap rings were a very thick loop, a tad too much for Heiman straps.

BELOW: you can see the selmer stylish thumbrest (very late modification), the plastic 2 point raised thumbrest.  Also the lyre holder is on the backside versus other locations such as on the front above the bell keys.

BELOW: mk VI palm keys, black G# / rectangular side F# & fixed thumbrest (superba 2) (click on pics for full page)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Altos & Tenors  
Superba 1s had rolled toneholes, whereas the IIs had standard straight toneholes.  Adjustable vs non-adjustable thumbrest (later 1s had the raised twin point plastic thumbrest.  1s had more engraving too.  Body to Bell brace on the 1s was two different sized circles,  IIs had a single wavy rod.  Also 1s had more engravings.  Neck octave mechanism on 1s was square rod whereas the 2s was round rod.  Also the neck receiver on the 1s was nicer as it included the lyre holder, with the 2s the lyre holder was lower than the neck receiver itself.

Really Early Superba's did not have a high F#, and the "side" F# was a straight key.  Later a high F# was added with the key touch for thus just above the touch for the straight key.  later the side F# was actually repositioned to the backside of the horn (like all other horns today), and the touches shapes were changed.  The design of this key change was done by Gary Ferree (rip) who at the time worked for Mr. Couf (rip) in the Detroit Engineering "company" of WT Armstrong.  They also were instrumental in the reverse engineering of the Royalist II which was based on the Royalist but totally made in the US in Elkhart (lower price point for students) as the Royalist & Royalist I still had high price points for students

Spare production was rolled to the "Armstrong Heritage" brand.  These could be a mix of 1s or 2s or 2s features with RTH .. ie, spare production and parts.

 

 

[ Superba 2 ]  [ Heritage Tenor mix ]


Below is a Superba 2 tenor.  Notice

ENGRAVING:  the "minimal" engravings compared to a Superba 1.  The S1 has it onto the Bell.
NECK: The wire octave mechanism versus the Superba 1s square wire.
TONEHOLES: No Rolled Tone Holds (RTH)
All other features are the same and vary dependent upon the vintage


Heritage Tenor

NOTICE:

NECK: Superba 1 type neck
ENGRAVING: Superba 2 type engraving - ie, it does not go low on the bell nor the bow.
KEY GUARDS: Selmer Style bell key guards
BELL BRACE: Notice the Bell brace.  Not the double loops of a Superba 1 and not the simple wavy rod of a Superba 2, it's a wavy cut out sheet.
OTHER: the thumbrest is a double raised point Superba 1 type.


BELOW: A really hard to find 65024 model which has an alternate F# trill, and the high F# is up on the post, with a see-saw alternate F#.  Fixed thumbrest.

BELOW: Early model with the plastic G# touch


Superba 1 Tenors:

NECK:  square rod (from a flat sheet actually) octave mechanism
THUMBREST: From adjustable metal to double point plastic
NECKSTRAP RING: always really thick, reverse tear drop shape
BELL BRACE:  bell brace made from 2 loops design

 

 

.

BELOW: Notice the Side F# and high F# touches

NOTICE The extended engraving down through the bow

 

Another generation of Superba 1

 

Superba 1 alto

 


BELOW and early generation of an alto, notice the "H Couf" stampe on the bell key guard

 

Below: A Black nickel Couf alto Superba 1

 

 

[ Back to Top]


Yamaha    [ Back to Top]

Model 61 - available in soprano, alto and tenor

Model 62 - improved intonation over the Model 61.  available in soprano, alto and tenor.

YTS-62 (original purple silk screen model)

Model 62R soprano  - rare curved neck model of the popular YSS-62

Model 855 alto - original top pro model alto

Model 875 sop, alto, tenor - top of the line french brass horns

Model 875EX - alto.  Most current production alto.

Model 62 II

Model 82Z - vintage engineering.  Special alloy body, 2 halfs of the bell are soldered together.

There are numerous other models including the designations 275, 52, 475, 21 & 23

Vito (Leblanc USA) also had their line of Yamaha alto and tenor line instruments based on the 23.  These are identified by the "Made in Japan" or simply "Japan" stamp near the serial number.



Yanagisawa [ Back to Top]

YANIGASAWA SAXOPHONES 
During the 1970's, the 3rd and 4th digit of the

serial number indicate the year of manufacture.

 
Serial#YearExamples
up to 001021431980 
00102144 - 001069811981 
00106982 - 001118921982 
00111893 - 001171421983 
00117143 - 001226631984 
00122664 - 001284851985 
00128486 - 001349031986 
00134904 - 001416581987 
00141659 - 001497741988 
00149775 - 001560061989 
00156007 - 001629681990 
00162969 - 001700731991 
00170074 -  001771171992 
00177118 - 001843181993 
077755xx 1970s Vito Yani soprano

Vito (Leblanc USA) had their "stencil" line of Yanagisawa for soprano and baritone saxophones.  These are identified by the "Made in Japan" or "Japan" stamp near the serial number.

[ Back to Top]


Couf (see Keilwerth for serial number ranges)

In the late 1960s and early 1970s Mr Couf decided to reverse engineer the Keilwerth Royalist horns and build them in Elkhardt to have a lower cost student horn.  AT this time apparently the labor in Germany was higher than in the US.  From their offices in Detroit, Couf & Co reverse engineered the Royalist alto and tenor saxophones and started producing the Royalist II.  The Royalist II is a spitting image of the Royalist horn except they had nickel keys and are made in the US.

Royalist II

 

Couf horns were part of the W.T. Armstrong umbrella.  Mr. Herbert Couf was president of W.T. Armstrong from the 1960's until 1989.  He also owned a pro level music shop in Royal Oak, Michigan called Royal Music until 1989.  Couf horns are basically Keilwerth stencils.  During the 1960's (Mr. Couf was know to have redesigned the horns but it is unknown when) Mr. Couf helped Keilwerth redesign the saxes. At this time Keilwerth sold many stencils and one of those being the Selmer H&A Bundy Special.  These horns are know by their larger sized bell, two point guard braces and, on their top models, Rolled Tone Holes.

Couf horns are still considered Pro horns today.  The Superba 1 is much more sought after than the Superba 2.  The S1 has Rolled Tone Holes which gave it a much more lusher sound than the S2.  This is one of my favorite horns.

Mr. Herbert Couf, President of W.T. Armstrong group
during the 1970s and 1980s had the Couf Superbas and
Royalist/Armstrong/heritage line of saxophones all from Keilwerth.
Some of which were sold as a competing model.
Royalist II saxes were made in Elkhart as a Reverse-engineered Keilwerth Royalist to reduce the cost.

Mr. Couf also owned Royal Music Store in Royal Oak, Michigan until 1989. I believe he now owns a home on a local Golf Course.

Amati, Dörfler & Jörka copied Keilwerths (1949 to 1968, then purchased by Keilwerth) and B&S

The earlier Keilwerth, alto, soprano and tenor all had metal thumbrests. Late model sopranos and altos had plastic thumbrests. The plastic thumbrest had a 2 point connection. This prevented breaking which apparently was a problem on Selmer horns at that time.

Superba 1s  (alto pics, tenor, soprano, baritone)
- have Rolled Tone Holes throughout the range of saxes, except for the Soprano.
- has an elegant, soldered, bell brace
- full bell & bow engraving
- lyre holder part of mouthpipe socket clamp mechanism (except soprano)
- neck upper octave key made from thick square brass rod
- Bow soldered directly to bow via an expanded section. Bow soldered directly to body via an expanded section.
No rings were used to combine the sections.
- early superba 1s do not have a high F# key. mid-early Superba 1s have a high F# key.
- early and mid-early superba 1 & 2s have a RH see-saw type F# key. later Superba 1 & 2s have a levered F# key.
- All post to body construction (no ribs)
- Early saxes had a removeable metal thumbrest. Late model sopranos and altos had plastic thumbrests. The plastic thumbrest had a 2 point connection. This prevented breaking which apparently was a problem on Selmer horns at that time.

Superba 2s
- have straight tone holes throughout the range of saxes plus the Superba 1 soprano.
- single rod bell brace
- bell engraving
- lyre holder soldered on separately below the mouthpipe socket sleeve
- neck upper octave key made from round brass wire
- Bow soldered directly to bow via and expanded section. Bow soldered directly to body via an expanded section.
No rings were used to combine the sections.
- early and mid-early superba 1 & 2s have a RH see-saw type F# key. later Superba 1 & 2s have a levered F# key.
- all post to body construction (no ribs)
- all thumbrests were metal and soldered in a permanent position on the body.

Superba 1s, it is said, have a more mellow and lush sound than Superba 2s due to the RTH vs non-RTH. This apparently keeps the stacks stiffer and parts of the body resonates less.
The Superba 2s supposedly have a more cutting sound similiar to Selmers of the time.
Both horns had oversized concave pearls that are very comfortable.
Non articulating low Bb keywork, but very fast and functional mechanisms.

For a few years the Superbas were available in black lacquer.  The engraving was done after the lacquer which provided a stunning visual affect of being able to see the engraving from a distance. This models had metal thumbrests and were probably late 70's models.

Both Superba 1 & 2s were considered Pro models.

H&A Selmer imported an early version of this horn before it became a Couf. These were H&A Selmer Bundy Special horns. Visually identifiable by the RTH (Rolled Tone Holes) and 2 point Bow & Bell Guards with mostly plastic pant leg guards.

[ Back to Top]

 [Clarinets]  [Mouthpieces]  [Repair] [Trial Policy] [Scales, etc.]