All pictures have been removed from this page.

All information on THIS PAGE is very old and not up to date. 

Please use the menu and go to the specific webpage for more up to date information and pictures

Nothing on this page hasn't been updated since at least 2009

 

Serial Number Lists :  Saxophones   Clarinets  Q&A

For Sale: Evette Master Model and Others.  Mouthpieces For Sale
Miscellaneous
List of Bore Sizes 1982 Price & model List
Serial Numbers
Alexandre(USA & Paris - Henri Selmer's brother)
Early G. Bundy
Leblanc Serial Numbers
Buffet Noblet  Serial Numbers (Bb, Alto & Bass)
Evette-Schaeffer Normandy Serial Numbers
Buescher Selmer(Paris)
Peter Eaton Clarinets Selmer(USA)
Artley Boosey & Hawkes
SML Eaton
Malerne Couesnon
Marigaux Yamaha
History Information
Leblanc, Noblet (Noblet, Normandy) History Alternative Keywork
Pictures & Emblems
Leblanc Nomandy Info & Emblems Leblanc Noblet Info & Emblems
Leblanc Emblems Selmer Paris Emblems
Selmer USA Emblems (Mazzeo system)  

If anyone has any information they wish to share about any item on or not on this page please contact  SteveSklar@gmail.com 

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Alexandre Clarinets

Alexandre Clarinets were from Henri Selmer's Brother Alexandre.  (in summary) Alexandre departed to the US in 1885 and was solo clarinetist for several of America's biggest Orchestras (Boston Symphony Orchestra, Cincinnati Symphony,  and New York Philharmonic Orchestra). He also struck out on his own and started manufacturing Alexandre clarinets in the US. 

He started the Selmer USA company in 1904 and then started importing his brother's, Henri Selmer, instruments to the US.   George Bundy, a former student, was hired to manage the company.  When Henri desperately needed assistance in producing clarinets Alexandre went back to France in 1910 and opened the Gazillion factory.  For a short period he produced Alexandre clarinets in France.  These clarinets are stamped "made in france" the US ones I believe had no marking of origin.  He then abandoned clarinet manufacture after helping his brother get his clarinet design "corrected". 

You could say the Alexandre clarinets were Selmer Paris prototype clarinets. BUT they are not.  Alexandre Selmer is a Selmer, but not a Henri Selmer and then Alexandre did design the new Henri Selmer clarinets which of course resemble his clarinets.

SN 726x - manufactured 1926-1927

NOTE: There are Alexandre saxophones but those are Italian made and no relation to Selmer

In 1927 George Bundy buys his store from the Selmers and becomes the sole distributor of the Henri Selmer Paris instruments.  He names his company "H & A Selmer Inc."  H&A probably standing for Henri & Alexandre.  H&A is seen on vintage Selmer USA saxophones.

Below is an earlier Alexandre.  throat keys are on separate posts but no throat adjusting screw and no trill guide

 


Artley

Artley Clarinet Serial Number List
Date Serial Number
1971 1000
1972 7901
1973 20001
1974 38001
1975 51701
1976 64701-75587
1977 75588-86511
1978 86512-100130
1979 100131-117758
1980 117759-135153
1981 135154-147454
1982 147455-165582
1983 165583-179967
1984 179968-199870
1985 199871-211588
1986 211589-231553
1987 231554-253170
1988 253171-265112
1988 3811988-3821777
1989 3900001-3930368
1990 4000000-4000600
1990 4030001-4055555
1991 4100001-4129999

sn 70065xx plastic student clarinet - This clarinet is interesting.  It's a polycylindrical bore,and the keywork is quite spread making it not the best for a student.  They play and sound nice though.

u


Barklee

Little is known.  They were made in New York City at one time and bought out be LeBlanc (unknown year)

Apparently they were manufactured on West 8th Street.


Boosey & Hawkes -  British

B&H ceased production when purchase by the Buffet Company. 

models:
"LeFluer" model are Malerne and Corton/Amati stencils (1950s)

1-10 (student plastic,  wood or rubber)
Marlborough (1960s) , Edgeware (1960s - 1970s) , and later the Emperor
Regent - both available in wood, plastic or rubber which varied over the years. Last made in 1970s before they were acquired by Buffet

2-20 (intermediate)
925 / 926  Imperial - available in mostly rubber but also wood

Series 2000 (Pro)
1010, 1010 Symphony

NOTE: Early wood student Regents (1950s and before) had pot metal keys which are very soft, easily breakable and close to unrepairable.  These clarinets are not worth much..  Models that do not have a serial number that matches the list may be made by Shreiber.  Student Models that have no bell ring may also be made by Shreiber.

Models Notes  
Edgeware   Junkdude.com

pic # 1
pic # 2
pic # 3
pic # 4

1010   see pics below in 1976


     
Boosey & Company    
1891 10984  
1900 13865  
1910 18497  
1920 22918  
1925 25661  
1930 28696  
Boosey & Hawkes    
1935    
1940 35142  
1944 36000  
1948 50900  
1951 52931 Flute & Clarinet SN's merged
1955 115630  
1960 183400  
1966 265000  
1967 277000  
1968 298000  
1969 311500  
1970 330000  
1971 350000  
1972 375000  
1973 395000  
1974 412000  
1975 435000  
1976 447000 1010 Symphony 4415xx
1977 466000  
1978 486000  
1979 500000  
1980 515000  
1981 526800  
1982 542100  
1983 55xxxx or possibly 652900  
     

 


G. Bundy

Early George Bundy clarinets have been rumored to be Selmer Paris clarinets.  But, here's something interesting:

Henri did not know George Bundy directly (assumption, but it's easy to assume that Alexandre knew him much better)
Alexandre not only Hired Mr Bundy to help run his US operations initially but Mr. Bundy was a student of his and of course later sold the operations to Mr Bundy.

Now,
If we look at the emblems on the Bundy clarinets, and compare the typeface to that of the Alexandre clarinets, they, at least on the examples i've seen, are the same.  So are G. Bundy clarinets actually Alexandre stencils ?   I would think so.  After all, there is alot of similarities between the Alexandre and Selmer Paris.  And we already know that Alexandre went back to Paris to help Henri Selmer refine his clarinets.  So, in short, I think G. Bundy clarinets are actually Alexandre stencils.  Why not, Selmer Paris isn't actually known to stencil very many trumpets, saxophones nor clarinets throughout it's history.

I have pics coming soon showing these similarities.


Not the greatest of pics right now.  But the Paris typeface is very similar.  I have another Alexander which has more similar typeface and keywork (trying to find).  But another possibility is that it is a Malerne stencil.  They used about the same fonts too.  After further investigation of Malernes I doubt it.  Back to the Alexandre and Selmer Paris investigation.

 



Buescher

Buescher True Tone.  Considered Professional level.  Blued steel springs.  Blued steel insertion plates in flat spring channels.   No "made in france" stamp anywhere though - not sure if they were manufactuered directly by Buescher or possible a stencil from Conn or anyone else.  Buescher True Tone Clarinet

 

 

Buescher 400 clarinets were stencils from Selmer USA.  Similar to the Selmer Signet 100 or 200.


Buffet Crampon Clarinets
http://www.buffet-crampon.com/buffetcrampon.asp?lang=english
Professional clarinets since 1825, factory established 1850.
This list does not include the Evette model clarinets made by Buffet

http://youtube.com/watch?v=QPWKD-3q1JU

Not sure where I got this blurb from, probably Boosey &  Hawkes (Buffet is now a separate wholly owned company)

"                                           Buffet History
Founded in 1839 by Jean-Louis Buffet-Crampon, Buffet clarinets soon became the choice of the majority of the world’s professional players. By 1900, Buffet had a workforce of 200 craftsmen, producing clarinets, flutes and saxophones, all of high quality.

Paul Evette and Ernest Schaeffer bought the firm in 1885. "Evette and Schaeffer" clarinets were the "step up" instruments from Buffet until about 1980. A public corporation since 1929, the company was absorbed into the Boosey-Hawkes conglomerate in 1981.

Instruments made between 1935 and 1980 are considered by many to be the very best of Buffet’s production. The American investor Martin Tolchin bought Buffet in the mid 1970’s. He was aware of the fact that not all clarinet players agreed on the tone-color of their instrument, so the "R-13" ("Arthur King", we call them...) model was soon joined by the "Continentale", the "S-1", the "BC-20" and later the "RC". All have subtle differences, all are considered to be "top of the line" equals. Before 1980, the Buffet name was only engraved on their best clarinets: the "step up" and student quality instruments were stamped "Evette & Schaeffer" or "Evette". Today, the Buffet name and logo are engraved on the entire line of Buffet instruments, from the German-made plastic to their very best clarinets

Buffet is now a part of the Boosey-Hawkes Musical Instrument Company of London."


Current Buffet History as taken from the Buffet-Crampon website
http://buffet-crampon.com/en/history.php

In 1825 a French “luthier”, Denis Buffet-Auger, established his workshop right in the heart of Paris. He quickly became well-known in the music world for developing of the excellent 13-key clarinet. At that time, clarinets were entirely hand-made, which required a wealth of experience and craftsmanship.

In 1830, Jean-Louis Buffet (Denis’ son) took over the business. He married Zoé Crampon in 1836 and so the famous Buffet Crampon brand name was created. The logo used today first appeared in 1844.

Louis-Auguste Buffet (Jean-Louis’ uncle) met the clarinettist Hyacinthe Klosé, a virtuoso musician and a teacher at the Paris Conservatory. These two men, the technician and the artist, worked together. They took the idea of movable rings which the German Theobald Boehm has developed for the flute and adapted it for the clarinet. First exhibited in 1839, this new system was very successful and in order to meet the demand, the Buffet Crampon factory was built in 1850 in Mantes-la-Ville. As early as 1866, Buffet Crampon was producing its first saxophones, 20 years after the invention of this instrument by the Belgian Adolphe Sax.

Buffet Crampon has received many awards for the quality of its instruments, notably in 1889 during the Universal Exhibition in Paris.

In 1918, Buffet Crampon entered the American market and established its position as the leader in the world of professional clarinets.

In 1921, a young beginner, Robert Carrée, was hired by the company. He was an extremely talented acoustic technician and developed the R13 clarinet in 1950 and the RC clarinet in 1975. These in turn led to the creation of the Festival and Prestige professional models.

The factory modernizes its workshops and has adopted modern technology, but remains faithful to its original standards for quality.

In 1981, Buffet Crampon was bought by the famous music publisher Boosey & Hawkes, of London.

Buffet Crampon has always had a tradition of innovation. In 1994, a new material was created and named Green Line. This innovative material is composed 95% of ebony powder and 5% of carbon fibre, eliminating the risk of cracking while maintaining the acoustic qualities of wood. Today the Green Line range is used worldwide by the greatest professional clarinet and oboe players.

In 2003, Boosey & Hawkes withdrew from the famous French manufactory of instruments, and sold it to The Music Group.

In 2005, Buffet Crampon regained its independence under the supervision of the President Paul Baronnat, who is deeply committed to the accompaniment of the musicians and the protection of the brand. In 2006, Buffet Crampon acquires two famous brands of brass instruments: Antoine Courtois Paris and Besson.

Since its inception, the company has ranked first amongst clarinet manufacturers, owing to its unrivalled expertise, innovative approach and modernised facilities, from which Buffet Crampon oboes, bassoons and saxophones also benefit.

The tradition, the spirit of the company and the musicians accompaniment have been, since 1825, and are now more than ever the centre of the dynamic of Buffet Crampon.


Models Notes  
  The modern Buffet logo first appeared on Buffets approximately in 1844  
Late 1800s No serial numbers

Wrap around register key
"teapot" tilted type register vent with no register vent protruding into the bore
No throat adjustment screw

"H. Bettoney" is stamped on the Bell as the US importer.  LP can be lightly seen under the UJ under the Made in France stamp below the Buffet Emblem.  The 1906 version of this clarinet has a normal backside register key & vent.

These early Buffets featured the cutout below the crows foot and a flat spring underneath the F#/C# key.  You can see the metal piece as the touch point for the flat spring in the cutout.  It also featured a flat spring on the C#/G#

 

 

 

 

 

1910-1930s 1910-1930s Buffets were imported by Carl Fisher and had an appropriate designation to that.  Any "LP" stamp designated Low Pitch at 440hz  
1936ish keywork modification (at least 1936) when the [a] added throat adjustment screw, [b] LH pinky spatula keys went from 1 shared post to two posts and rods; [c] and 2 horizontally placed screw thumbrest.  [d] The LH side sliver key still closes a small vent key - fork Eb/Bb mechanism (see pics of 1936 in SN list)  
1941-1950 Carl Fisher Musical Instruments Company of New York continued to import the Buffet clarinets.  They (Carl Fisher and not Buffet) had the designations of R13, R13 1/2, R14, R14 1/2, R16 R16 1/2, R16 3/4 - this was found in the Carl Fisher catalogs, not on the clarinet itself. 
The "1/2" represented an Eb lever.
The R14 had 17 keys and 7 rings & the Eb lever. 
R16 was the 19 key, 7 ring with articulated G#, Eb lever and forked Eb key.
R16 3/4 had 20 keys, 7 rings, articulated G#, Eb lever, forked Bb and a partridge in a pear tree !!
 
pre R-13 Pre-R13s Stopped production around 1955.  Visual attributes: Shared throat post keys; key guide for top two trill keys is a flat metal with triangular sides.

From at least 1941 - 1955 Pro Buffets had a "Master Bore".  During the 1950-1955 time frame Carree's polycylindrical bore was used experimentally and evolved towards the introduction of the R-13 in 1955.

 
R-13 Started Production in 1955 through today. 

Some "prototypes" were developed earlier than 1955. Primary identification included separate throat key posts; shape of the key guide for the top two trill keys - R-13 has a cylinder with slot cut down the middle.

 

 
  Early R13s has a flat spring for the C#/G# key until, supposedly 1970.  To some, this provides a much smooth key action.  This was the preferred method going back to the earliest Buffets but was not used in the 1940s - mid 1950's - as a needle spring was used.

We offer a service where we can retrofit a flat spring to the C#/G# key for those that prefer it (the needle spring can be unhooked and kept in position if desired)


 
R-13 RC    
E-13
(High end Intermediate)
pre E-13s (before they were sold as Buffets) are Evette-Schaeffer and Evette clarinets - please see that section for more information.  
C-12
(Conservatory/High end Intermediate)
   
E-11
(Beginner ntermediate)
Made in Germany.  Current E-11s have plastic tonehole inserts  
Academy
R113
R113s were also known as the Academy model which were supposedly identical to R13 with some minor default such as body or key scratched.

Apparently the Buffets from 38,000 through 41,000 were designed with a lower joint a bit too large.  This created a problem with clarinetists playing the instrument in tune and Buffet was losing business. Buffet brought in Hans Moenig who some how corrected the faults and these instruments were relabeled as an Academy model and sold as a student model.

 
International German made.  
S-1 1970s.  R-13 with a inverse taper barrel for a slightly brighter sound. Recognizable by the S1 in a diamond below the Buffet emblem.  
Limite A store marketed brand (Brooke Mays, Caldwell Music of the US) of the E-11 with a cheaper plastic thumbrest, soft sided case, silver plated keys.

Recognizable by "Limite" in script below the Buffet emblem.

 
Olds Opera &
Linton
supposed R-13 stencils (or Master Models) from the 1960s and 1970s. BUT since this really can't be proven they really don't sell for much.  
Jazz Festival    
Buffet Elite Manufactured from the 1980s through 2002. Thin wall body made of a premium grenadilla. The reinforcing rings were made of black polycarbonate fiber.  It was supposedly designed for "chamber" settings and not orchestra or concert band setting  
B12 (brushed) Very lightweight brushed plastic, great for beginners.  Made in West Germany and the quality is unmatched for a student instrument.  Excellent keywork, fit and finish.  
B12 (polished)    
Evette predecessor to the B12 - separate throat key posts, triangular trill key guide an a large Evette emblem on a plastic body  

 

     
1825-1885 no records  
1885 1A-408A  
1886 409A-999A  
1886 A1 - A886  
1887 A887-A999
B1 - B999
1B - 417B
 
1888 498B-999B
1C - 999C
C1 - C300
 
1889 C301-C999
D1 - D999
1K5211D-348D
 
1890 349D - 999D
E1 - E999
1E - 316E
 
1891 317E - 999E
F1 -F999
1 F-190F
 
1892 191F - 999F
G1 - G999
1G - 58G
 
1893 59G - 999G
H1 - H999
1H -1 84H
 
1894 185H - 999H
I1 - I665
 
1895 I666 - I999
1I - 999I
J1 - J617
 
1896 J618 - J999
1J - 999J
K1 - K514
 
1897 K515 - K999
1 K - 999K
L1 - L561
 
1898 L562 - L999
1L - 999L
M1 - M590
 
1899 M591 - M999
1M - 999M
N1 - N440
 
1900 N441 - N999
1N - 999N
O1 - O521
 
1901 O522 - O999
1O - 999O
P1 - P999
1P - 374P
 
1902 375P - 999P
R1 - R999
1R - 404R
 
1903 405R - 999R
S1 - S999
1S - 999S
T1 - T40
 
1904 T41 - T999
621T - 999T
U1 - U999
1U - 81U
 
1905 82U - 999U
V1 - V999
1V - 751V
 
1906 752V - 999V
X1 - X999
1X - 999X
Y1 - Y840
 
1907 Y841 - Y999
1Y - 999Y
Z1 - Z999
1Z - 812Z
 
1908 813Z - 999Z
1A2 - 1A999
2A1-999A1
1B1 - 1B999
B21 - 60B1
 
     
1913 1H501-1H999
2H1 - 999H1
1I2 - 1I999
2I1 - 413I1
 
1914 414I1 - 999I1
41J2 - 1J999
2J1 - 224J1
 
1915 225J1 - 999J1
1K2 - 1K341
 
1916 1K342-1K999
2K1 - 460K1
 
1917 461K1-999K1
1K2 -1K521
 
1918 1K522-1K999
2L1 - 661L1
 
1919 662L1 -999L1
1M2 - 1M800
 
1920 1M801-1M999
2M1 - 999M1
11N2 - 1N515
pic courtesy of Junkdude.com
Picture 1
Picture 2
Picture 3
Picture 4
Picture 5
Picture 6
Picture 7
1921 1N516 -1N999
2N1 - 999N1
1O2 - 1O193
 
1922 1O194 -1O999
2O1 - 692O1
 
1923 693O1 -999O1
1P2 - 1P999
2P1 - 536P1
 
1924 537P1 - 999P1
1R2 -1R999
1R1 - 226R1
 
1925 227R1 - 999R1
1S2 -1S876
 
1926 1S877 - 1S999
2S1 - 999S1
1T2 - 1T508
 
1927 1T509 - 1T542  
1928 1 - 2500  
1929 2501 - 4999  
1930 5000 - 7499  
1931 7500 - 9999  
1932 10000 - 12500  
1933 12501 - 15000  
1934 15001 -18000  
1935 18001-20000  
1936 20001 - 22000 pics courtesy Junkdude.com
picture 1
picture 2
picture 3
picture 4
picture 5
1937 22001 - 24000  
1938 24001 - 26000  
1939 26001 - 27000  
1945 27001 - 28000  
1945 -1957 about 3000 per year 1955 - official production of the R-13
1958 58835 - 59143  
1959 59144 - 62457  
1960 62458 - 65956  
1961 65957 - 68717  
1962 69718 - 75319  
1963 75320 - 78093  
  Apparently the most wanted Buffets are from the range 83k to 200k (1965 to 1979)  
1964 to 1966 78094 - 93203  
1967 93204 - 99331  
1968 99332 -105617  
1969 105618-114416  
1970 111417-117747  
1971 117748-126209  
1972 126210-133903  
1973 133904-143517  
1974 143518-153323  
1975 153324-163567  
1976 163568-173826  
1977 173827-183901  
1978 183902-191872  
1979 191873-201531  
1980 201532-210652  
1981 210653-221260  
1982 221261-234695  
1983 234696-250371  
1984 250372-266396  
1985 266397-277482  
1986 277483-292267  
1987 292268-302623  
1988 302624-312699  
1989 312700-324769  
1990 324770- Buffet Jazz Festival 333xxx
     
 

Between 1968 and 1974 Buffet also made the Super Dynaction Bb clarinet.  Few of these are known in existance though they seem to have a low demand due to their jazz heritage.

Evette Master models with the cutout under the RH  crow feet are the identified R-13 rejects.

Approximately 1990 Buffet changed their lineup.

Pre-1990

Pro to Beginner:  R13 (Pro) - C12 (Intermediate) - E45 (Intermediate) - E11 (Beginner) - B12 (Beginner)

Post 1990

Pro to Begginer: R13 (Pro) - E13 (Intermediate) & C12 (conservatory intermediate) - E12 (Intermediate) - E11 (Beg) - B12 (Beg)

C-13 (aka International)  is the equivalent to an E-11 but it was manufactured as a "private brand" for another US company

Top of Page

 

Buffet E-13 Clarinets
 Serial number Year of make Notes, pics
10109-16377

1961-1966

 
16378-23007

1966-1969

 
23008-29623 1969-1973  
29624-32167 1973-1975  
32168-42803 1975-1977  
42804-49092 1977-1979  
49093-56536 1979-1981  
56537-62684 1981-1983  
62685-70191 1983-1987  
     

Buffet Harmony Clarinets
 

 Serial number Year of make Notes, pics
19506-19578 1950  
19579-19638 1951  
19639-19680 1952  
19681-19781 1953  
19782-19965 1954  
19966-20091 1955  
20092-20154 1956  
20155-20237 1958  
20238-20401 1959  
20402-20502 1960  
20503-20511 1961  
20512-20692 1962  
20693-20775 1963  
20776-20864 1964  
20855-20911 1965  
20912-21054 1966  
21055-21209 1967  
21210-21358 1968  
21359-21432 1969  
21433-21500 1970  
21501-21587 1971  
21558-21627 1972  
21628-21702 1973  
21703-21796 1974  
21797-21953 1975  
21954-21999 1976  
22000-22114 1977  
22115-22233 1978  
22234-22350 1979  
22351-22425 1980  
22462-22535 1981  
22536-22692 1982  
22693-22859 1983  
22860-23059 1984  
23060-23274 1985  
23275-23462 1986  
23463-23619 1987  
23620-23875 1988  
23876-24190 1989  
24191-24506 1990  
24509-25221 1991  
25222-26077 1992  
26078-26734 1993  

Top of Page
 

Evette-Schaeffer

E-S information provided by Rich Holmes

"Plastic Evette became the B12.
Wooden Evette became the E11.
Evette Master Model became the E12.
Evette & Schaeffer became the E13.
Evette and Schaeffer Master Model is supposedly an R13 with cosmetic flaws (this one is debateable as Buffet won`t give much info on this - some say it is an acceptional sounding E13 - either way it`s a good clarinet)"
Evette-Schaeffer Master Model From other discussion it appears the story about cosmetically flawed R13s being sold as E&S Master Models is incorrect  -- and that cosmetically flawed R13s have been sold as Buffet Academy models. 

Other recommendations include that some Master Models are R-13 (as are Olds Opera's).  But during what part of the R13 process were they declared not fit for R13s?  This could occur any time in the R13 process.  Therefore, theoretically a Master Model could be from the same wood selection only of an R13 all the way to the end of production after some visual flaws are found.  So, theoretically, a Master Model could be an R13 in all ways except for a few visual flaws OR could only be from the wood selection of an R13, and all other things potentially different.

Evette-Schaeffer Master Models range from K5000 to K11000 which corresponds to 1953 to approx 1961.  These can be considered the best as they also correspond to the R-13 introduction.

1960 Buffet Brochure about the E&S Master Model: "Instruments that embody considerable hand craftsmanship, as do all the Buffet products, will vary slightly from instrument to instrument. Those Evette & Schaeffer clarinets that surpass the superb quality characteristic of al E&S instruments, are set aside to comprise the ME-13 Master Model Evette & Schaeffer clarinets."  The 1968 price list for an "E&S E13" clarinet is $250 and for the E&S Master Model ME-13 is $299.  The E13 would finally get a Buffet logo in the 1980s

 

 

The words "Master Model" may be above or below the logo; Upper and/or lower joint and/or bell

 

Evette Master Model    

The words "Master Model" may be above or below the logo

No letters
Serial  Date  Source  Markings  Case and notes 
2027     eBay 9/06 On bell and top joint: "Evette & Schaeffer" / "Paris" / "France" in oval. "Modele Buffet-Crampon" below oval.  Rectangular case, brown w/ brown lining, w/ lift clasps, holding barrel separate (maybe room for 2nd barrel or reed case), rear compartment.
56xx     eBay 9/06 Modele Buffet-Crampon. Rounded rectangular case, black w/ blue lining, w/ lift clasps, holding barrel separate, L side compartment.
         
A series
Serial  Date  Source  Markings  Case and notes
A series  "early-mid thirties based on its keywork"  [1]   ?   ?  
A1568  1930s?  [2]   ?   ?  
[edit]B series
Serial  Date  Source  Markings  Case and notes  
B series  "From what I've read (and the dating of older E&S clarinets is difficult) I think the B series is from the 1940's or early 1950's (?)."  [3]  --  --  
B388   ?  [4]  "The Evette-Schaeffer name is inside the upper arc of an engraved oval, with Paris in the center and France on the bottom of the oval. Underneath the oval is Modele Buffet-Crampon."   ?  
B0770   ?  [5]   ?  "... colored a rusted brown and has rounded edges with the metal stamp of Buffet on it. It has two locking [button] latches. ... The inside of the case is a burgundy colored velvet with an area at the back of the case that holds extras such as the swab, lyre, etc. (Just one long open area across the back). There is also one small section that measures about 1x2 inches where the reed case goes. "  
B1074  1930s-1940s Germany*  [6]  "the bell of my instrument says, 'Made in France'."   ?  
B1814   ?  [7]   ?   ?  
B1273   ?  eBay 9/06  On bell: "Evette / Schaeffer" [punctuation unclear] / "Paris" / "France" in oval, "Modele Buffet-Crampon" below oval.  Rounded rectangular case, brown w/ brown lining, holding barrel separate (maybe room for 2nd barrel or reed case), rear compartment.  
B1497  1950s?  [8]   ?   ?  
B2542   ?  [9]  Eveette&Schaeffer, Paris, France. Modele Buffet-Cranpon.   ?  
B29xx   ?  eBay 9/06   ?   ?  
B4477  1952 (June 1952 per B&H)  [10]   ?   ?  
B5604   ?  eBay 9/06   ?   ?  
B6816   ?  eBay 9/06   ?   ?  
B7129   ?  eBay 9/06  On barrel: "Evette & Schaeffer" / "Paris" / "France" in oval. "Made in France" above oval. "Modele Buffet-Crampon" below oval.  Rectangular case, brown w/ brown lining, w/ lift? clasps, holding barrel separate, room for 2nd barrel or reed case, rear compartment.  
B7382   ?  [11]  "Modele Buffet Crampon Made in France"  Velvet lined-orange/brown Leather Case  
B7899  pre 1956 (sold on 8 Aug 1956)  eBay 9/06   ?  Rounded rectangular case, brown w/ brown lining, w/ spring clasps, holding barrel separate, room for 2nd barrel or reed case, rear compartment.  
B8193   ?  [12]  Modele Buffet-Crampon.   ?  
D Series
D33xxx - 1973
K series
Serial  Date  Source  Markings  Case and notes  
K series  "The last series was the K-series. It began around 1953 according to the Boosey & Hawkes web site."  [13]  --  --  
"Buffet started making K series around 1930 and continued until they became E-13."  [14]  --  --  
K81  ~1941*  eBay 9/06  "The trade mark says below the Evette & Schaeffer 'modele buffet-crampon'".  Bell end case, black w/ red lining, w/ button slide clasps and center lock, holding barrel on top joint, round cork grease RR, reed case LC.  
K179  1930?  [15]   ?   ?  
K4xx  1942 "The seller had an apparent sales receipt for the instrument dated 1942."  [16]   ?  [I suspect this is actually K512, see below]  
K512  1943 "There was a bill of sale with the instrument dated early 1943 that appeared to belong to the instrument."  [17]   ?   ?  
K569   ?  eBay 9/06  "All 5 pieces are marked with 'Evette & Schaeffer Paris France Modele Buffet-Crampton'."  Bell end case, black w/ purple lining, w/ spring clasps.  
K23xx   ?  [18]  "Evette & Schaeffer Paris, France Modele Buffet Crampon Made in France"   ?  
K24xx  "This was my clarinet that was purchased new for me. I think it was purchased about 1954."  J. Martin, R. Holmes (eBay 8/06)  On all parts: "Evette & Schaeffer" / "Paris" / "France" in oval, "Modele Buffet-Crampon" below oval, "Made in France" well below oval.  Bell end case, black w/ purple lining, w/ spring clasps, holding barrel separate, room for reed case (probably), flat cork grease RR.  
K4000  1952 -- according to B&H site in 2002 -- earliest K series serial number available from that site  [19]   ?   ?  
A K4xxx on purchased eBay had identical keywork to a 1955 R-13.
K5077  1953 "The Buffet site lists K5077 as built in 1953"  [20]  [Master Model]   ?  
K55xx  1960s  eBay 9/06  On bell: "Evette & Schaeffer" / "Paris" / "France" in oval, "Modele Buffet-Crampon" / "Made in France" / "Master-Model" below oval.  No case.  
K6285   ?  eBay 9/06  On top joint: oval (unclear), "Made in France" / "Master-Model" below oval.  Brown lining, holding barrel separate, front and side compartments.  
K67xx   ?  eBay 9/06  [Master Model]   ?  
K7631   ?  [21]  Evette & Schaeffer, "Master Model" above oval, "Modele Buffet Crampon" below oval.   ?  
K8222  "I've seen a questionably source that said s/n K8222 sold new in 1958."  [22]   ?   ?  
K9193   ?  eBay 9/06  "Master Model" above oval, "Evette & Schaeffer" / "Paris" / "France" in oval, "Modele Buffet Crampon" below oval.  Rectangular case, black w/ blue lining, w/ spring clasps, holding barrel separate, room for 2nd barrel or reed case, rear compartment.  
K10452   ?  eBay 9/06  On all pieces: "Evette & Schaeffer" / "Paris" / "France" in oval, "Modele Buffet Crampon" below oval.  Rounded rectangular case, brown w/ brown lining, holding barrel separate, reed case, rear compartment.  
K10511   ?  [23]  [Master Model]   ?  
K10593   ?  [24]  [not Master Model]   ?  
K124xx   ?  eBay 9/06  Modele Buffet-Crampon.  Rounded rectangular case, brown w/ brown lining, holding barrel separate (maybe room for 2nd barrel or reed case), rear compartment.  
K135xx   ?  [25]  [not Master Model]   ?  
K15901   ?  eBay 9/06  On bottom joint: "Master Model" above oval, ? in oval. "The instrument has the factory markings Buffet Crampone & Co Paris and Evette & Schaeffer along with the words Master Model on both large pieces of the clarinets body."   ?  
K16121  1965  [26]   ?   ?  
K18xxx  1968  [27]  [Master Model]   ?  
K187xx   ?  eBay 4/06 (L. Peters)  [not Master Model]  Black rounded? rectangular.  
K227xx   ?  [28]  [Master Model]   ?  
K230xx  pre 1976 "I have owned this clarinet for over 30 years" (in 2006)  eBay 9/06 (& seller response to question)  "Evette & Schaeffer" / "Paris" / "France" in oval, "Modele Buffet Crampon" below oval.  Rectangular case, black w/ blue lining, w/ spring clasps, holding barrel separate, room for 2nd barrel or reed case, rear compartment.  
K23367   ?  [29]   ?   ?  
K25860   ?  eBay 9/06  On top joint: "Evette & Schaeffer" / "Paris" / "France" in oval, "Modele Buffet Crampon" below oval.  Rounded rectangular case, black w/ blue lining, w/ spring clasps, holding barrel separate, room for 2nd barrel or reed case, rear compartment.  
K28717   ?  eBay 9/06  "ALL PIECES ARE STAMPED MADE BY BUFFET EVETTE &SCHAEFFER"  Rectangular case, black w/ black lining, w/ lift clasps, holding barrel separate, side compartment.  
K31536   ?  [30]   ?  Rectangular case, black? w/ red lining, lift clasps, L side compartment.  
K33487  ~1975  [31]   ?   ?  
K351xx  1960s  eBay 9/06  On barrel: Lyre above oval, "Buffet" / "Crampon & Cie" / "A Paris" in oval, script "R"? / "Made in France" below oval. On top joint and bell: "Evette & Schaeffer" / "Paris" / "France" in oval, "Modele Buffet Crampon" below oval.  Rectangular case, black w/ blue lining, w/ lift clasps, holding barrel separate, room for 2nd barrel or reed case, rear compartment.  
K35339  around 1976 (from s/n)  eBay 9/06   ?  Rectangular case, brown leather with red/pink lining, turn clasps on side, holding barrel separate, L and F compartments.  
K35468  1976 (from s/n)  eBay 9/06  On barrel: "Evette & Schaeffer" / "Paris" / "France" in oval, "Modele Buffet Crampon" below oval.   ?  
K444xx   ?  eBay 9/06  Made by Buffet-Crampon.  
K44445  1978  [32]   ?   ?  
* Note that Buffet serial number list shows no Buffet production 1940-1944 -- it seems particularly improbable that Buffet would have built clarinets in Germany in the "1930s-1940s". 
Retrieved from "http://editthis.info/clarinet_wiki/Evette_and_Schaeffer_serial_numbers"

Couesnon

Monopole - professional line of clarinets (and saxophones, trumpets, etc)

     
1952 189xx  

 

1958 26000  
1960 28564  

 

1961/2 30595  
1962 31430  
1970 34823  

Thanks to Chris J for the Couesnon information and pictures


Peter Eaton Clarinets

Peter Eaton clarinets are fairly new to the marketplace (compared to Selmer, Buffet & Leblanc)

http://www.eatonclarinets.freeserve.co.uk/

International - small bore

2006    S586

Elite - large bore - .6045" entry   .5985 bottom of top joint  2007  model

Apparently (unconfirmed) Eaton clarinets are a rendition of the Boosey & Hawkes 1010 clarinets, but improved all around. Keywork molds apparently from B&H.  The B&H Symphony model is nearly identical to the Eaton clarinets.


Selmer (London)

The following is used with permission from Mr. Don Mackrill and his fine website.  Check it out sometimes, full of information and history.

http://www.donmack.com/SelmerSaxophones/SelmerLondon.htm

The Story of HENRI SELMER Co London

An Englishman called Ben Davis was demobbed from the British Army in 1919, after the First World War, just when Dixieland jazz and dance music was becoming popular in the UK. being fascinated by the new sounds, Ben taught himself to play the saxaphone. He played with many of the big bands in the country, and finally formed his own.

Ben was a man of considerable drive and ambition,seeing further potential on the business side of the music Instustry and following a meeting with Henri Selmer in 1928, Ben established the Selmer Company in London, at No 12 Moor Street . The first premises were soon outgrown by 1933, when the business was moved to 114-116, Charing Cross Rd.in the Centre of London which was there head Office and Showroom until the 70's.The company's greatest period of expansion was from 1934 to the start of World War II in 1939. By then Selmer was the biggest company in the British musical instrument industry. After the war, Ben's brother Lew Davis, who was a professional trombonist, joined the company. They opened another shop in Charring Cross Road run by Lew Davis specializing in Brass and woodwind instruments.

The Selmer company remained and established its sucessful business at the Charring Cross Road address which was in the centre of London untill the early 70's.

Selmer London were major importers of Brass and wind instruments. Apart from being the exclusive UK Distributor for Selmer Paris , they had there own brand names, which were very successful .Such Student Lines as ,Console and Sterling Clarinets,Flutes and Oboes, Gold Seal Flutes ."Karl Meyer "and "Pennsylvania Student Saxophones" followed later by the "Super Pennsylvania " which was made by Yanagisawa in Japan and was marketed as a step up horn.

During the 60's Selmer went into manaufacturing amplification and importing famous names such as Hofner ,Gibson,Fender Guitars and distributing their own brands like the "Futurama" guitar made in the Czech Republic,all with great success. In the early 60's Selmer were the main agents for the US made Lowry organs.

In 1972 Selmer moved their operation to Woolpack Lane in Braintree Essex. I remember at the time the Selmer Mk6 production had ceased and my patrtner L:aurie Naiff and I bought the remaining stocks they had in their warehouse a total of 45 saxes some in silver some in two tone, some F# keys,some had low A bells. When the Mark VII's eventually became available in London ,they were a hard to sell product. The main complaint was the the left hand little finger cluster, it seemed that the instrument was designed for a Gorrila ,compared with the comfortable Six. In 1974 I was at a trade show in Chicago and flew into New York for the Newport Jazz Festival, I got very friendly with the horn players in the Gillespie Band who were appearing at the Buddy Rich club,we met every night before the show for a drink, then I would have a meal and watch the the Band for the rest of the night. I mentioned that I had Mark VII alto's and Tenor's in my Take Five London store they were eager to see them ,so I flew them over for them to give them a try.They were not impressed ,in the end I sold them to Rod Baltimore on 48th Street. Rod thought they were great instruments.

At that time in Rod's store he had one of these Yanagisawa Soprano Saxophones , in London we had never heard of them. At the time they were very popular with the American pro players. I had a closer look at one and reconised it as the "Selmer Super Pennsylvania" that we were selling back in London as a step up instrument from the Selmer "Karl Meyer" and the Selmer "Pennsylvania "saxes. The same sax was also turning up with different names from places like South Africa.

During this time (1974) the new Mk7 was being introduced into the UK , they were only producing Alto's and Tenor's which the Soprano market was left open. This was a major coup for Yanagisawa being able to market under their own name and put them their name on the map.

During this same period a very similar situation help Yamaha .The Selmer Mk7 not being that easily accepted by the profession ( mainly for the Gorrila like fingering) left the market open in the UK in which Yamaha took advantage and got in with their model 62 thanks to the expertise of Bill Lewington the Yamaha importer at the time.

Selmer London was evetually sold to Norlin USA in the 80's

Ben Davis retired to the south of France and lived well into his late nineties . In the UK he left a great legacy and a hard act to follow. HENRI SELMER COMPANY UK

selmer console steel ebonite.
serial w01090
 


Selmer(USA)

Selmer USA information is sketchy at best. Please contribute information. If anyone has any information they wish to share about any item on or not on this page please contact  Steve 

Selmer USA has manufactured various clarinets under the Signet brand since about 1945. These have almost always been inferior to the Selmer-Paris models, but during WWII, Paris clarinets were, for obvious reasons, not available here

The Selmer USA serial numbers for the forties, in the list that I have, show a gap between 30,000 (10/15/40) and 33,000 (6/1/47) presumably because of the war.

Selmer USA began making (or selling) Manhatten metal clarinets and Manhatten wood clarinets in the 1920s and/or 1930s.

Bundy

Wood Bundys started production in 1941.

Plastic Bundys started production in 1948.
With World War II cutting off the import of Selmer Paris instruments George Bundy started the line of of Bundy student instruments then added the Signet intermediate line.  But some of the first Bundy wood clarinets were apparently Selmer Paris instruments in disguise.  So production of Bundy clarinets would have started before their supply was cut off (or after the war ?).

Signet Specials

Signet Specials started production in 1941 or 1946.  The early Signet Specials has the insignia on the barrel as well as on the other pieces.  The barrel insignia was stopped around 1955. The early Signet Specials had a guide for the top trill key which was gone in 1955 but reappeared in 1960.  In 1955 the tan leather cases were introduced but the inside arrangement and outside label was different.  The badge on the 1960 case had Selmer in red letters. By the late 1960's the case was black plastic or fiberglass and had Signet in a circle. Sometime in the mid 1960's the Mazzeo Signet Special models  (see the brochures below) were produced along with the regular model with the serial numbers being the same series as the regular model.

Selmer Mazzeo Clarinet Article
Mazzeo Brochure #1
Mazzeo Brochure #2

Mazzeo Mechanisms
The Mazzeo mechanism on the Signet allows the player to switch between "Mazzeo" mode and regular Boehm.  The first picture has a Bundy Mazzeo (on the bottom) and a Signet Mazzeo (on the top)




The Signet mechanism (left) shows it in the Mazzeo position.  It has a knurled end "plunger" mechanism to turn the Mazzeo system on/off.  To dsconnect you simply push the mechanism in.  To reconnect you pull it out.

Mazzeo information, brochures and pictures provided by S. Page, UK

Signet Special 100 evolved from the Signet Special sometime in the 1970s with the serial number list continuing as before. Around this time the Signet Resonite was also produced.

Selmer Soloist

The Soloist possible had their own set of serial numbers starting possible in the 1950s.

Selmer USA supposedly was not making clarinets from 1944 through 1946


Approximate Serial Number list

Signet special serial numbers
Looks like they must have started at end of WWII (1946,7 ?) or possibly 1941

3500 initial annual production /200 = 17/working day or about 2/hr

7000s
11863
25815
26000 ~ 1955 (John O's is 26754) no guide on highest trill key
30354 – case and clarinet still look like ’55 model
33608 - no guide on highest trill key, puchased new, per owner 1958
40403 - bought used in 1962
41297 – Seller thinks 1965 purchase
42984 - DEC 1960 ? 17000 in 5 years (~ 3400/yr) (3300/yr for 13 years?)
48863 – case etc. like ‘70s (no metal on center tenon ? replaced?)
57918 – bought in 1968, per original owner
62135 - bought in 1968, per original owner
64176 - Signet Special Mazzeo
65000 ~ 1967 (3200/yr for 20 years?)
71436 – bought Dec. 9, 1967 per receipt
72216 Aug 1969 30000 in 9 years (~ 3300/yr) (72000 in 22 years? 3100/yr)
77344 ?
803XX - bought new in 1970 per owner
81976
84273 Mazzeo that fairly knowledgeable seller claims was made in 1965 (more likely 1975)
85703 (100) seller says 1975 (but also claims age of 35 years making it 1969)
90276 (100) seller says 1973
111610 – seller says approx 1976
151462 ~1980 74000 in 11 years (~ 6700/yr) (about 4/hour) 125000 in 25 years ~ 5000/yr (151000 in 33 years? 4000 + /year?)
177773 ?
194936?
256153 ?

Soloist serial nos

Looks like they have own set of numbers

13028 bought early in 1960/per paperwork
16228 ? (has features of specials above say 35000)
203xx 1953?
23824
25846 purch 4/13/76 w/paperwork
27882?
37795 –owner told suzie ray it was purchased new in 1994
100 serial nos: are these a separate series or are specials, soloist, and 100s intermingled ? Plastic Signets?
85703 seller says 1975
one seller says purchased in 1973
90276 ?
120912 Sellers husband says new in ‘75
131482
146587
164644
180052 - 1979 (probably wrong)
203120
216891
235888 (bought used in 1994)
246815
247832 about 1995
254954
260037 (seller claims 1999)Looks like these things may sit around music stores for years.
263889 seller says 1997 (sounds reliable) (264000 in 50 years? ~ 5300/yr?) possible
266510 seller says 93, 94
271746

Thanks to John O. for his contribution to Selmer USA information

Selmer USA Emblems
Selmer Signet Soloist (top of the line Selmer USA) – was (is) supposedly Selmer Paris body & keys.  Modern ones may not be, unconfirmed information. Good value instrument.  Quality close to a Noblet 45. 

- silver plated keys

at least 1991 to

metal tenon joints top and bottom of upper and lower stack.  May be constructed from Selmer Paris body tubes.

 

 
Selmer Signet Special (2nd from Selmer USA)

- metal tenon joints upper and lower stacks
- Older ones may have metal tenon only on the lower joint to the bell

 


(left from ebay)
Selmer Signet 100 (3rd from Selmer USA)

Visually identifiable by no metal tenons on the upper joint (unless repaired) and a metal tenon on the lower joint for the bell.


(from Cindy Chastain)

 


Selmer (Paris) Clarinets

Professional clarinets since 1885  The Series: is the letter in the serial number itself and not the model Series.
 Example: Selmer, Series 10S, #B0478 is a B Series made in 1980.
We have no information on Selmer clarinets made before the L Series

Selmer Paris clarinets in various years through the 1980s had markings similar to "Sole Agents, US & Can Selmer New York  - Elkhart".  Clarinets with markings similar to these can be identified as clarinets exported to the United States.  European and Canadian Selmer clarinets had no markings.

Harmony and Metal clarinets were serialized separately until at least 1930. By the N series all their instruments are serialed together.  Later Metal clarinets had and adjustable barrel with a highly grooved section, earlier models where not adjustable.
Date Soprano Harmony Metal
1/1/19 (14) 1000    
1/1/20 (15) 2000    
1/1/21 (16) 3000    
1/1/22 (17) 4000 300  
1/1/23 (18) 5000 (300)  
1/1/24 (19) 6000  Old Emblem 65xx    
1/1/25 (20) 7000    
1/1/26 (21) 8000    
1/1/27 (22) 9000 1000  
1/1/28 (23) K1000    
1/1/29 (24) K2000 2000  
1/1/30 (25) K3500  (K3000)    
1/1/31 (26) K5000  (K4200)    
1/1/27 K5600    
1/1/28 K7000   1000
1/1/29 K8400   sn1906 courtesy of Junkdude.com
Pic # 1
Pic # 2
Pic # 3
Pic # 4
Pic # 6
Pic # 7
1/1/30 K9800 900 2000
1/1/31 L1000 Later Metal clarinets had an adjustable barrel with a highly grooved section, earlier models where not adjustable. --> Bb 23xx & A 29xx with adjustable barrel
Pic # 1
Pic # 2
Pic # 3
Pic # 4
Pic # 5
1/1/32 L2100   3000
1/1/33 L3250    
1/1/34 L4300   4000
1/1/35 L5500    
1/1/36 L6600   5000

RI - Radio Improved started around K7000
BT - Balanced Tone started around L5000

The modern Selmer emblem starts in 1926, somewhere around K4500. There  was also an earlier emblem, up to somewhere in the 4000's, that has a  winged globe over the H SELMER A PARIS oval. I have heard that the  winged-globe emblem indicates the era when Henri Selmer himself still  tested and finished the clarinets but that's purely anecdotal, there's  no reason to assume it's true.

The RI model begins around K7000, the BT around L5000.  The articulated G# was not particular to the M-series, it appears in  some horns of every model up to even the 10S.

K Foster

Year of make Serial number Emblems (click on pic to see larger view)
1885 to 1926

1904 - clarinet launched at the Saint Louis / USA Exhibition

no records  
1/1/1927 #400  

150x Pic1  Pic2  Pic3 Pic4 Pic5 Pic6

1/1/1929 #3070  sn#531x
1/1/1931 #9999  
L Series:  
12/1/1931 L1000  
1932 L2100  
1933 L3250  
1934 L4300  
1935 L5500  
1936 L6600  
1937 L7750  
1938

L8800

 
1939 L9900  
M Series - Emblem Change  
2/1/39 M1000 Customers M series had old Emblem - but according to henri-selmer.com it was changed in 1926

 

1940

M2400

New Selmer Emblem
1944 M3400  
1945

Selmer 55

1945 only (?)

M6000

 

 

Emblem of sn # M70xx
Below- M 61xx.  This shows the large register nut associated with 55s. Also, inside it shows the thread and nut protruding into the bore.

 

1946 M8000  
N Series - Later N series were also known as BT - Balanced Tone - both identifiable by a large domed speaker bush (the body octave hole) with two holes to remove it, and a removeable speaker tube.
10/1/46 N100  
2/1/47 N1000  
1948 N2800  
1949 N4900 Partial Boehm N54xx
1950 N6600  
1951 N8100  
P Series - Centered Tone series - identifiable by a large hexagonal speaker bush (the body octave hole).  Benny Goodman made these instruments famous.
1952 P1200  P1549 - Partial Boehm
1953 P4200  
1954 P7400  
Q Series:    
1955 Q1100  
1956 Q4350  
1957 Q7290  
     
R Series:    
1958 R1200  
1959 - Mazzeo system (more information) R6100 Selmer Mazzeo Clarinet Article
Mazzeo Brochure #1
Mazzeo Brochure #2
     
S Series - 1960 - Series 9 started production (large diameter tone holes with no undercutting) and 9*
1960 S1150 Selmer 9* emblem
 
1961 S4160  
1962 S7390  
T Series:    
1963

T1400

 
1964 T5800  
     
U Series:    
1965 U1100  
1966 U5700  
     
V Series:    
1967 V1000  
1968 V4800  

v789x Series 10 Bb - Bb & A

1969 V7900  

v822x Series 10 A Bb & A

     
W Series:    
1970 W1700  
1971 - Series 10 is launched (per Selmer) W5900  
     
X Series:    
1972 X1500  
1973 X6400  
     
Y Series:    
1974 Y1200  
1975 Y6300  
     
Z Series:    
1976 Z1100  
1977 - model 10 SII is launched Z5200  
     
A Series:    
1978 A1000  
     
B Series:    
1980 & 1981    
1984 - Recital series launches    
     
     

9* - reduced some tone hole diameters and introduced undercutting and a smaller bore.  10 move towards a polycylindrical bore.  10G - work with Anthony Gigliotti to mimic the Buffet design.

During the M series there are two distinct versions of them, also during that timeframe was an emblem change.  On all the M Series the G# was located for the LH pinky but also for the RH ring finger.  This design put the G# tone hole on the lower body, and also had the top lower body tonehole go through the upper body joint and cork. During this timeframe the emblem changed from a round oval to the current circular leaf design.

Selmer Emblems
Old Selmer Emblem
  • Transition during the M series
  • Buffet like
  • The saxophone emblem was changed in circa 1926.  The Clarinet emblem was changed in the 1940s
 
New Emblem Selmer (to current)
  • Transition during the M Series
 
   
   
Selmer 10G
  • "G" stands for Gigliotti, a principal clarinetist in the Philadelphia Symphony
 
Selmer 10S
  • Followed the 10G in production
 
   

 

Top of Page


Leblanc / Noblet / Normandy Clarinets History

Old Contact Info New Contact Info (2005)

Founded by D. Noblet of France in 1750
Celebrating their 250th anniversary this year

G. Leblanc Corp. has never released a serial number list.
They may give you the information if you contact them.

G. Leblanc Corporation
7001 Leblanc Boulevard
P.O. Box 1415
Kenosha, Wisconsin  53141-1415 USA

Telephone: (414) 658-1644

Fax: (414) 658-2824

 

Conn-Selmer, Inc.
600 Industrial Parkway
P.O. Box 310
Elkhart, Indiana 46515 USA

Telephone: (800) 348-7426

Conn-Selmer bought GLeblanc USA corporation in 2005.  They do not own Yanigasawa (they use Leblanc as a USA distributor.  Nor do they own Leblanc Paris which also used them as a builder/distributor).

Leblanc/Noblet History (taken from gleblanc.com before the Conn-Selmer buyout - just in case it gets removed)

Other recent milestones have also marked Leblanc's centuries-old history and traditions. The Noblet name, for example, still vital as a brand within the Leblanc France line, marked its 250th anniversary in the year 2000, and the Frank Holton Company, Leblanc’s brasswind division, celebrated its centennial in 1998. G. Leblanc Corporation itself, founded in 1946, marked the beginning of a new era of vigorous leadership in 2003 when Leon Pascucci assumed the primary management role upon the death of his father, Vito Pascucci.

Since its modest beginnings in America as a two-man shop, the company grew to a position of international prominence under the leadership of its cofounders, Léon Leblanc (1900-2000) and Vito Pascucci (1922-2003). The Kenosha-headquartered corporation employs a family of some 300 workers at three sites in Wisconsin (two in Kenosha, one in Elkhorn) and about 40 workers in La Couture-Boussey, France.

The story of Leblanc's inception and ultimate growth is one of the most captivating and well known in the music industry—the stuff of which, as the saying goes, legends are made.

French roots. Leblanc in America traces its origins to the founding of Ets. D. Noblet of France in 1750, when the great flourishing of instrumental music at the court of Louis XV created a demand for musical instruments of all kinds. More than any other instrument manufacturer, Noblet refined and developed early woodwind manufacturing techniques, securing for the French nation its preeminent reputation for producing the best wind instruments in the world. Based in La Couture-Boussey for two and a half centuries, it is among the oldest continuously operating companies in France.

In 1904, having no heirs, the Noblet family passed its holdings to Georges Leblanc, descendant of a long line of distinguished French instrument makers. By the time he acquired Noblet, Georges Leblanc had gained a reputation as one of the finest woodwind makers in France. The workshop at the Leblanc headquarters in Paris became a meeting place of the great woodwind artists of the era. Working side by side with Georges was his wife, Clemence, who actually managed the factory while Georges fought during World War I.

From the beginning, the Leblancs were constantly guided by scientific principles and inspired by their inborn musical genius. As a result of this relentless dedication toward progress, Georges Leblanc and his son, Léon, set up their Paris workshop as the first full-time acoustical research laboratory for wind instruments. They recruited the talents of Charles Houvenaghel, regarded at the time as the greatest acoustician since Adolphe Sax.

The subsequent growth and success of G. Leblanc Cie. as a manufacturing entity was largely due to the work of Léon Leblanc, who in addition to his reputation as an instrument maker and businessman, was also a gifted clarinetist, holder of the first prize of the Paris Conservatoire, the first and only instrument maker to have held such an honor.

He had before him a brilliant career as a concert clarinetist, but chose instead to remain true to his heritage, feeling that he could make a greater contribution to music by combining the talents and sensitivities he developed as a musician with his skills as an instrument maker.

Together, Georges, Léon and Houvenaghel pushed the theoretical limits of instrument design to produce the first truly playable complete clarinet choir, ranging from sopranino to octo-contrabass, encompassing a range that surpasses that of the orchestral string sections. Perhaps even more significant, the Leblanc firm was the first instrument maker in history to manufacture clarinets with interchangeable keys, resulting in instruments that were easier to play in tune by artists as well as beginners.

As Léon Leblanc once noted, “Musicians of today should not be handicapped by the deficiencies of those before me. Acoustical, mechanical and musical improvements will be made. To this end, I have dedicated my life.” Monsieur Leblanc served as chairman of the American company and président honoraire of the French firm until his death in 2000 at the age of 99.
The history of Leblanc in Kenosha, Wisconsin, dates to the last months of World War II and a chance meeting between Léon Leblanc and Vito Pascucci.

The American connection. Born in Kenosha, Vito Pascucci showed a marked interest in music and played cornet in the Kenosha High School band. He became fascinated with the construction and design of musical instruments and learned their repair as a summer apprentice at the Frank Holton Company (the Elkhorn, Wisconsin, brass-instrument manufacturer that Leblanc would later acquire), and then, while still in high school, augmented his family’s income by operating an instrument-repair shop at his brother’s music store.

In 1943, Pascucci was called into the armed forces. His instrument-repair skills were rewarded when he was assigned as a trumpeter and repairman to Army Field Bands, then to the Army Air Corps Band, led by Glenn Miller. He began with the Miller band in New Haven, Connecticut, then traveled with them to Europe. Stationed in England, Pascucci and Miller formed plans to set up a chain of music stores after the war.

Miller's untimely death put an end to those plans, but when the band was sent to newly liberated France, Vito paid a visit to G. Leblanc Cie., and his guide that day was Léon Leblanc. After service discharge in 1946, Pascucci returned to Kenosha, where Mr. Leblanc asked him to establish a foothold for the French company in America.

A shop for the purpose of disassembling, climatizing and reassembling wood instruments was set up as part of the new firm. After shipment to America by sea (and later by air), the wood was allowed to stabilize under the new atmospheric conditions, and the instruments were restored to original factory specifications, reassembled, adjusted and thoroughly tested.

Thus the instrument retailer was assured that wood clarinets would be delivered in perfect playing condition. Discriminating clarinetists were assured that every instrument would be musically as well as mechanically correct. And band directors were assured that the instruments their students played would possess a harmonious timbre, have correct intonation and be free of mechanical deficiencies.
Soon, in the 1950s, due to an ever-growing school market, demand for Leblanc instruments in the United States was far greater than the French concern could meet, so Leblanc began producing plastic-bodied clarinets in Kenosha.

The Vito line of musical instruments was thus born, thrusting Leblanc to the forefront of the student clarinet market. In 1951, construction of Leblanc’s Kenosha factory was completed, a plant that to this day provides a model for the industry in its modern equipment, efficient operation and attractive appearance. Ever-increasing production called for the factory’s subsequent expansion in 1953, 1960 and 1966. In 1999, Leblanc added 37,000 square feet of modern manufacturing and warehousing space to its Kenosha headquarters, bringing even greater flow and efficiency to its work flow.

Through the years, Leblanc’s staff developed innovative methods that brought the production of plastic-bodied instruments to then unknown levels of accuracy and consistency. Rough-cut body blanks of a specially formulated plastic called Resotone were crafted into clarinets with the same care that wood instruments were afforded, rather than merely injection-molding the finished clarinet joints as some other manufacturers were doing at the time.

Unique precision boring machines simultaneously bored out the plastic body blanks, drilled tone holes and the holes for keyposts. Developed internally, these drilling machines enhanced consistency and efficiency manyfold. If all their operations were to be performed separately, it would have been impossible to achieve Leblanc’s legendary consistency and precision in construction. These machines revolutionized the way plastic clarinets were made, and today, have been replaced by even more sophisticated CNC drilling machines.

In 2004, a new line of student woodwinds was introduced bearing the Leblanc USA brand, a marketing shift that now allows clarinetists to play "Leblanc for life."

Decades of growth. In 1964, Leblanc acquired the Frank Holton Company, located in Elkhorn, Wisconsin, one of America’s most prestigious brass-instrument manufacturers. With this acquisition, Leblanc not only gained the revered Holton name, but procured the priceless experience of the craftsmen who had worked there many years prior.

Holton’s famed Collegiate line made Leblanc a major presence in the school brasswind market, and this student-priced line then and still does set the school standard. With the acquisition, Leblanc also gained a friend in Philip Farkas, one of the world’s leading hornists and teachers. The line of instruments to which the late Mr. Farkas still lends his name comprises the world’s bestselling student and professional French horns.

In 1968, Leblanc acquired the Woodwind Company, a respected manufacturer of clarinet and saxophone mouthpieces. Under the guidance of G. Leblanc Corporation, the Woodwind Company brand is widely recognized for the excellence of its manufacture and performance.

The Martin Band Instrument Company was acquired by Leblanc in 1971 from the Wurlitzer company and was relocated to Kenosha from Elkhart, Indiana. Martin, founded in Chicago, would have been America’s oldest continuously operating band-instrument manufacturer if not for the Great Chicago Fire. The famous Committee trumpet, favored by Wallace Roney, Chris Botti and other top jazz artists, and the innovative Urbie Green trombone both carry the legendary Martin name, made in a progressive, modern plant.

On January 1, 1981, Leblanc was granted the exclusive rights to market Yanagisawa artist saxophones in the United States and Canada. Considered the most technically advanced saxophones made, Yanagisawa instruments are played by some of the world’s foremost saxophonists.
In April, 1989, Leblanc USA acquired majority interest in the esteemed French firm and assumed responsibility for its management.

A new generation. Leon Pascucci (namesake of Léon Leblanc) joined his father at Leblanc in 1971, serving in various capacities throughout the company’s operations. In 1991 he was named president, and in 2001 he became chief executive officer. The shareholders of G. Leblanc Corporation, meeting the week after Vito Pascucci’s death, named Leon Pascucci to the position of board chairman on August 28, 2003.

In addition to his many years of service to Leblanc, the younger Pascucci has volunteered his services to numerous organizations, both locally and within the music industry.

Pascucci currently serves on the boards of the Music Distributors Association, the NAMM Museum of Making Music, the American Music Conference, the National Bandmasters Association and the Berklee College of Music Board of Visitors. He is a past president of the National Association of Band Instrument Manufacturers and a past board member of NAMM, the International Music Products Association.

Pascucci is also well known for his design abilities, which he has applied to Leblanc’s exhibits at NAMM, to the company’s offices and factories, and to a gallery of miniature interiors, which have been nationally published. What’s more, Leblanc’s new student clarinet case is a reflection of Leon’s design sense.

A look behind, a look ahead. In the years since its inception, Leblanc has earned a solid reputation as an innovator in instrument design, manufacturing technique, modern marketing programs and award-winning national advertising campaigns.

Even more important, no other manufacturer can offer as wide a selection of brass and woodwind instruments crafted with the same integrity and dedication to excellence as does Leblanc. Through all stages of the company’s growth, advancement and acquisitions, it has never lost sight of the principles on which it was founded. Long ago, Georges Leblanc established the basic tenets of integrity, musicianship and creativity for his firms to live by. At Leblanc, Inc., these principles still live on, propelling the company into the 21st century.
Since 1750, Leblanc has been—and remains—committed to the highest standards of excellence, all in the service of musicians and of music itself.

Approximately 1978 Leblanc bought out Normandy corporation and incorporated them as a beginner line with Noblet and Leblanc clarinets.

Keywork

Leblanc had a major keywork change from "standard" keywork to the sculpted "bridged" keywork.

Vintage Keywork
  • Buffet, Noblet, etc like. RH top stack side keys angle off from the levers.

Years: ???? to ????

 

 

Modern Keywork
  • Tone holes inline. Keywork has "bridged" sections that raise above the other key toneholes
  •  

Years: ???? to ????

 
Current Keywork  

Leblanc Emblems:
LeBlanc Emblem #1
  • "LEBLANC" in block letters.
  • "G" above Leblanc in same areas
  • Years: ???? to ????
 
LeBlanc Emblem #2
  • "G.LEBLANC" follows the contour of the upper area.
  • No separate "G"
  • Years: ???? to ????
 
Leblanc Emblem #3
  • "G" separated from name area
  • "LEBLANC follows contour of area
  • Years:  ????  to ????

 

Leblanc Dynamic
  • Dynamic in script on top
  • Leblanc emblem similar to #3
 
Leblanc LL Paris

sn # 275xx

PDF Brochure 1
PDF Brochure 2
PDF Brochure 3
PDF Brochure 4

 
LeBlanc L7

Model Evolution:
L7
L70 (model 1170)
L27 (reverse cone to cylinder of 14.75mm)
L200 (reverse cone to 14.6mm)
L300 LX (reverse cone)
LX2000 (reverse cone)

L7
 

L200
 

Leblanc Classic

SN235xx made before 1960

Leblanc Classic

Leblanc Classic II
 
Leblanc Symphonie II

- small bore comparable to Buffet.

Model Evolution
Symphonie Model - 1950  (raw nickel silver)
Symphonie - 1955-56 (silver plated keys)
Symphonie II -
Classic - late 1950's
Classic II (nickle plated keys)
Symphonie 3 - mid 1960s (raw nickel silver keys)
Symphonie IV

Classic & Classic II - Leblanc reintroduced the Symphonie in the late 1950's as the Classic line but then dropped it and reintroduced the Symphonie.

Leblanc Symphonie Model (from eBay)

Leblanc Symphonie II

Symphonie 3
 
Model 176 - approx 1954 vintage "176" stamped above the Leblanc emblem on top section
Modern Leblanc Symphonie VII  
Leblanc - Stubbins like mechanism for Bb. Patented in 1933  
 
Serial Number Log for  Leblanc Clarinets
 
L27 / L200 / L 300 / 1167 (L7)  / 1189 / 1190 / 1276 / 1610 / 1611 & 1612 models Leblanc 340
Bass Models #  328 / 330 / 400 / 415 / 417 / 425 / 430 Leblanc France Clarinets
Leblanc 342 Leblanc 350
   
   
   
L27 / L200 / L 300 / 1167  / 1189 / 1190 / 1276 / 1610 / 1611 & 1612 models
1964 16000 21999
1965 22000 22999
1966 23000 25999
1967 26000 27499
1968 27500 30315
1969 30316 32271
1970 32272  1176/LL 32860 33143
1971 33144 35934
1972 35935 37539
1973 37540 40182
1974 40183 41548
1975 41549 42989
1976 42900 44522
1977 44523 47760
1978 47761 48795
1979 48796 50634
1980 50635 52560
1981 52561 52879
1982 52880 53000
1983 53001 55146
1984 55147 57480
1985 57481  
     
Leblanc 340
1964 1000 1189
1965 1190 1408
1966 1409 1539
1967 1540 1650
1968 1651 1762
1969 1763 1899
1970 1900 1977
1971 1978 2075
1972 2076 2176
1973 2177 2275
1974 2276 2310
1975 2311 2389
1976 2390 2433
1977 2434 2482
1978 2483 2490
1979 2491 2500
1980 2501 2507
1981 2508 2510
1982 2511 2518
1983 2519 2530
     
Leblanc Bass Clarinets

Models #  328 / 330 / 400 / 415 / 417 / 425 / 430

1964 7600 8119
1965 8120 8360
1966 8361 8706
1967 8707 9147
1968 9148 9471
1969 9472 9852
1970 9853 10249
1971 10250 10601
1972 10602 10888
1973 10889 11240
1974 11241 11639
1975 11640 11956
1976 11957 12315
1977 12316 12810
1978 12811 13108
1979 13109 13509
1980 13510 13736
1981 13737 13891
1982 13892 1400
1983 14001 14219
1984 14220 14844
     
Leblanc France Clarinets
1964 16000 21999
1965 22000 22999
1966 23000 25999
1967 26000 27499
1968 27500 30315
1969 30316 32271
1970 32272 33143
1971 33144 35934
1972 35935 37539
1973 37540 40182
1974 40183 41548
1975 41549 42989
1976 42900 44522
1977 44523 47760
1978 47761 48795
1979 48796 50634
1980 50635 52560
1981 52561 52879
1982 52880 53000
1983 53001 55146
1984 55147 57480
     
Leblanc 342
1964 27 136
1965 137 199
1966 200 380
1967 381 469
1968 470 622
1969 623 720
1970 721 780
1971 781 879
1972 880 1009
1973 1010 1079
1974 1080 1130
1975 1131 1202
1976 1203 1212
1977 1213 1281
1978 1282 1330
1979 1331 1349
1980 1350 1365
1981 1366 1375
1982 1376 1395
1983 1396 1409
     
Leblanc 350 
1964 300 331
1965 332 369
1966 370 420
1967 421 445
1968 446 463
1969 464 476
1970 477 490
1971 491 511
1972 512 519
1973 520 543
1974 544 556
1975 557 563
1976 564 574
1977 575 619
1978 620 624
1979 625 630
1980 631 635
1981 636 640
1982 641 645
1983 646 650
     
Leblanc 352
1964 12 59
1965 60 102
1966 103 150
1967 151 210
1968 211 279
 1969 280 299
1970 300 424
1971 425 441
1972 442 489 
1973 490 520
1974 521 529
1975 530 544
1976 545 605
1977 606 636
1978 637 644
1979 645 655
1980 656 659
1981 660 665
1982 666 670
1983 671 675
     
Leblanc Bass Clarinets Models #400,415,417,425,430,325,330
1964 7600 8119
1965 8120 8360 
1966 8361 8706
1967 8707 9147
1968 9148 9471
1969 9472 9852
1970 9853 10249
1971 10250 10601
1972 10602 10888
1973 10889 11240
1974 11241 11639
1975 11640 11956
1976 11957 12315
1977 12316 12810
1978 12811 13108
1979 13109 13509
1980 13510 13736
1981 13737 13891
1982 13892 14000
1983 14001 14219
1984 14220 14844
     
Leblanc 417 Bass Clarinet
1978 12560 12750
1979 12751 13220
1980 13221 13978
1981 13979 14010
1982 Disc. Disc.
     
Leblanc Classic 476
1964 18000 22999
1965 23000 23999
1966 24000 25699
1967 25700 28411
1968 28412 30950
1969 30951 31600
1970 31601 33425
1971 33426 34899
1972 34900 37419
1973 37420 39204
1974 39205 42030
1975 8701 8847
1976 8848 8872
1977 8873 8893
1978 Disc. Disc.
     
Model 7165
1964 1207 1643
1965 1644 1976
1966 1977 2385
1967 2386 2868
1968 2869 3566
1969 3567 4553
1970 4554 5581
1971 5582 6762
1972 6763 7387
1973 7388 7612
1974 7613 8297
1975 8298 8683
1976 8684 9130
1977 9131 9505
1978 9506 9750
1979 9751 1040A
1980 1041A 1172A
1981 1173A 1414A
1982 1415A 1601A
1983 1602A 1800A
1984 1801A 1938A
1985 1939A 2098A
1986 2099A 2154A
1987 2155A 2290A
1988 2291A 2421A
1989 2422A 2551A
1990 2552A 2631A
1991 2632A 2823A
1992 2824A 2976A
1993 2977A 3085A
1994 3086A 3115A
1995 3116A 3197A
1996 3198A 3233A
1997 3234A 3344A
1998 3345A 0170A
1999 0171A 3585A
2000 3586A 3644A
2001 3645A 3737A
2002 3738A 3878A
2003 3879A  
     
Models 7166/7168
1964 101A 989A
1965 990A 2459A
1966 2460A 3525A
1967 3526A 4385A
1968 4386A 7148A
1969 7149A 8594A
1970 8595A 9760A
1971 9761A 1808B
1972 1809B 2025B
1973 2026B 4188B
1974 4189B 5888B
1975 5889B 6949B
1976 6950B 7244B
1977 7245B 8365B
1978 8366B 9445B
1979 9446B 623C
1980 624C 1401C
1981 1402C 2212C
1982 2213C 3109C
1983 3110C 3564C
1984 3565C 4902C
1985 4903C 5797C
1986 5798C 6630C
1987 6631C 7559C
1988 7560C 8544C
1989 8545C 9707C
1990 9708C 1173D
1991 1174D 2650D
1992 2651D 3666D
1993 3667D 5369D
1994 5370D 6265D
1995 6266D 7504D
1996 7505D 8897D
1997 8898D 0616E
1998 0617E 2160E
1999 2161E 4042E
2000 4043E 6353E
2001 6354E 8847E
2002 8848E 1224F
2003 1225F  
     

 


LeBlanc Noblet clarinets Emblems

LeBlanc Noblet clarinets Emblems
Noblet buffet-like emblem

at least since 1940's to 1962

SN# 267C

Known as Model 40. Some model 40's had ebonite bells and those ones were later known as Model 27s after the emblem change.  Some 27s may also have had ebonite barrels.

 
Noblet 40 Square emblem

at least since 1973 to 1990?

 
Noblet 40 new ugly emblem

at least since 1990? to current

 
Noblet 45 - ND at the top of the Emblem

at least since 1962 to 1990?

SN#46xxx

 
Noblet 45 Artist

Not sure on years but keywork is inline, scupted like Leblanc but sheet metal trill key guide.  Noblet emblem has the double diamond, thus a newer emblem.

 
Noblet 45 - double diamond emblem.  Only an "N" inset in a small diamond at the top of the Diamond emblem

1990 ? - current

SN # 415A

 
Early Noblet 40 1960's Brochure - 1
Early Noblet 40 1960's Brochure - 1
Receipt from early Noblet 40

 

Serial Number Log for Noblet 27, 40 and 45
Year First Model of Year Last Model of Year
1830 A beautiful example of a Noblet Box Clarinet.
1920's - 1930's metal Metal Noblet SN73xx
unknown years 4854D Noblet 40 (later known as 27)
1960 contains 18559
     
1964 38500 42999  42849 Normandy 10
1965 43000   53xxx N45 clarinet 55999
1966 56000 58399
1967 58400 66999
1968 67000 78999 
1969 79000 91299
1970 91300 98700
1971 A101   7811 Noblet 45
A415 Noblet 45
A12417
1972 A11101 A16000
1973 A16228 A33700
1974 A33701 A44832
1975 A44833 A57320
1976 A57321 A66597
1977 A66598 A76349
1978 A76350 A87894
1979 A87895 A96499
1980 A95000 B10309
1981 B10310 B10700
1982 B10701 B25890
1983 B25891 B28146
1984 B28147 B45800
1985    
1986    
     
Noblet 55 / 60 Alto Clarinet
1964 4200 4564
1965 4565 4799
1966 4800 5103
1967 5104 5374
1968 5375 5600
1969 5601 5733
1970 5734 5902
1971 5903 6035
1972 6036 6132
1973 6133 6228
1974 6229 6354
1975 6355 6469
1976 6470 6617
1977 6618 6693
1978 6694 6774
1979 6775 6868
1980 6869 6959
1981 6960 6965
1982 6966 7052
1983 7053 7123
     
Noblet 55 (60) Bass Clarinet
 1964 4700 5113
 1965 5114 5399
 1966 5400 5899
1967 5900 6487
1968 6488 7076
1969 7077 7329
1970 7330 7626
1971 7627 8034
1972 8035 8373
1973 8374 8765
1974 8766 9194
1975 9195 9683
1976 9684 9815
1977 9816 10565
1978 10566 11114
1979 11115 11421
1980 11422 12065
1981 12066 12654
1982 12655 12793
1983 12794 12972
1984 12973 13430
     
     


(Leblanc) Normandy clarinets (current student line known as Noblet 4)

Normandy used to be a separate brand before Leblanc bought them in 1978.  I believe they were a closely cooperating company with Leblanc as the bodies seem to be very similar to the Noblets in dimensions including the tenon rings and certain era of keywork. Tonal-wise of the various vintages of Nomandy 4, 8s and 10s I have discerned very little tonal qualities differences.  Though they were of various vintages, various conditions and various times; so little could be learned.

Before the buyout Normandy had an entire line of Clarinets. Normandy (ebonite), Normandy 4, 8, 10, and 12. They also had "Special" models in which some may have had silver plated keys (a step up), others ebonite bells (a step down) and Buffet/Selmer type keywork.  After the buyout I believe only Normandy 4s existed.  Bores are identical to the Noblet 40/45 line; very good rich tone though thicker wood bell and tenons not as tight fitting the tone is slightly not as complex nor as spread.

Normandy also had a 5 and 7 model.  The Normandy 7 had the Buffet/Selmer type keywork (not inline trill keys but offset).  The Normandy 5 had inline trill keys and a plastic barrel and bell.

Since Selmer USA's purchase of GLeBlanc USA (primarily a distributor) the Normandy line seems to have been dropped.  The Normandy 4 is now a Noblet 4.

Overall, these are very good instruments for the money when properly set up.

- Some Normandy Special sn 9541A  had a stamp "Made by Noblet" at the very top of the top joint.

Normandy Resonite emblem  
Early Normandy - SN # 1697.  Only with a Normandy emblem and FRANCE underneath it.  Probably the precursor to the Normandy 4 branding.  Some early Normandy 4s had the 4 emblem on the lower joint only.  
Normandy 4 emblem
  • "4" in sheild
  • The 4 is now a Noblet 4 intermediate clarinet sold by LeBlanc (3/2006)

906xx Normandy 4 (purchased in 1978)

 
Normandy 5
  • "5" below the Normandy emblem in a circle
  • Keywork has inline trill keys.  Plastic barrel and bell

 

 
Normandy 8 emblem
  • "8" above shield similar to N10 model  OR
  • "8" in circle below Shield and Made in France
 
Normandy 10 emblem
  • "10" above shield
  • "France" is below the shield emblem
 
Normandy 12
  • "12" above the shield
 
Liberty Noblet (Normandy) Clarinets -  In late 2005 the Music Group had a essay contest about band directors for "why your band director is the best". The winning school received a complete set of special branded instruments, they were branded "Liberty".  This included Armstrong Flutes, Bach Trumpets, Noblet Clarinets, Bach Trombones, Selmer Alto and Tenor Saxophones.  These are not professional instruments.  These are not intermediate instruments, but student instruments. The Noblet clarinet is somewhat stripped down Noblet.  The clarinet, model LCL-100 had a "retail" price list of $730 Link # 1

Link #2

 
Serial Number Log for Normandy 8, 10 & 4 (and probably the other models too)
1964 24000 35500
1965 35501 42000
1966 42001  (42849 N10) 47000
1967 47001 51500
1968 51501 55398
1969 57401 59750
1970 59751 53804
1971 53805 65499
1972 65500 69699
1973 69700 82363
1974 72364 74728
1975 74729 76007
1976 76008 78349
1977 78350 86946
1978 86947 91100
1979 91101 93648
1980 93649 96859
1981 96860 9760
1982 97761 98257
1983 98258 B26150
In the late 1980's Normandy changed the method of springs (cheaper) Instead of the normal needle spring they went to a coiled spring for the C#/G# key    

Leblanc

Leblanc

Vito

     
Vito Clarinets Models 7212,7213,7214,v40,cl612,cl614,7242
1972 A80000 B00235
1973 B00236 B19755
1974 B19756 B43177
1975 B43178 B67359
1976 B67360 B89670
1977 B89671 C00000
1978 C11804 C30365
1979 C30366 C54833
1980 C54834 C75803
1981 C75804 D01578
1982 D01579 D25635
1983 D25636 E13604
1984 E13605 A07632
1985 A07633 A22037 
1986 A22038 A37938
1987 A37939 A61456
1988 A61457 A86496
1989 A86497 B14492
1990 B14493 B40076
1991 B40077 B64823
1992 B64824 B89436
1993 B89437 C18260
1994 C18261 C45957
1995 C45958 C74050
1996 C74051 D04016
1997 D04017 D33263
1998 D33264 D62070
1999 D62071 D86150
2000 D86151 E09559
2001 E09560 E33519
2002 E33520 E53900
2003 E53901  
     
     
Model 7131RK
1970 1 500
1971 501 2155
1972 2156 3529
1973 3530 4421
1974 4422 12000
1975 12001 25603
1976 25604 30827
1977 30828 33947
1978 33948 38844
1979 38845 42434
1980 42435 47975
1981 47976 52455
1982 52456 58306
1983 58307 62177
1984 62178 68524
1985 68525 72535
1986 72536 78579
1987 78580 85091
1988 85092 89758
1989 89759 501000
1990 501098 510332
1991 510333 511518
1992 511519 515800
1993 515801 519845
1994 519846 526925
1995 526926 533097
1996 533098 537807
1997 537808 552998
1998 552999 560613
1999 560614 575843
2000 575842 587455
2001 587456 624567
2002 624568 654084
     
Model C-602R
1980 12283 12908
1981 12909 13475
1982 13476 14839
1983 14840 15621
1984 15622 15765
1985 15766 15816
1986 15817 15960
1987 815771 822151
1988 822152 824515

 


SML (Marigaux, Lemaire and Strasser)

If anyone has any information they wish to share about any item on or not on this page please contact  Steve   Thanks.  Steve

SML (Marigaux, Lemaire and Strasser) made three levels of clarinets - Professional with 5 stars,  Intermediate with 4 stars and Student.  There was also a model which only had "SML" without a model name; SML also had an entry level clarinet made of hard-rubber. 

Post 1960 the student ones were made of plastic

SML also made Evette clarinets for Buffet and various other stencils such as Olds, Conn and Linton.  Schriber also made Evette clarinets for Buffet

King - King distributed SML clarinets. All SML clarinets distributed by King had a crown on them.  The word "King" was inscribed under the crown.  King Marigaux, King Lemaire, and King Strasser. 

Unfortunately many SMLs may also have no specific inscription and are only identifiable by specific keywork.  In this case the octave key easily identifies a SML:  Symphonie Artiste

King Lemaire emblem (from eBay)

 

an interesting article  http://idrs.colorado.edu/Publications/DR/DR5.3/strasser.html


Malerne

The history of Malerne clarinets is sketchy at best, so the following information may be correct at one certain time or another.  If you have any more accurate information please please contact  Steve   

Malerne has three distinct soprano clarinets.  The "Professional" which had 4 stars, the "Intermediate" which had 3 stars, and the "Standard" model which had no stars and was considered the student model.  Malerne (like SML) stenciled their clarinets and you can find Malernes as Conns, Olds and Linton and possibly others.

The Standard model apparently did not have an adjustment screw on the G#/A throat keys on the early ones.  The Intermediate and Professional did (I assume all the time).  The bore on the standard (on one measured instrument) was smaller  at .577 than the Intermediate and Pro.  Not many of these have passed through my hands and I have not kept any measure dimensions or pics of them.
In 1904 Mr. Malerne was a Noblet foreman and played in the La Couture Municipal Band when Mr. Georges Leblanc was the Director. In 1930s LeBret (Paris) was sold to Malerne. In 1975 Malerne was bought by SML.

Malerne Standard Emblem

 

A1816 & A43xx has the Bb throat adjusting screw.  ( The dates are really just a guess )

 

A6793 - 1942ish no lining and no throat adjusting screw.  Yes, if you noticed the A6793 (supposedly a later serial number has no adjusting screw, where as the A43xx has one)

 

Dxxxx    1945ish

E3491 - 1946ish -  had that nickel silver lining in the upper joint.  adjusting screw on the throat keys.  Pics are from top of top joint, and from bottom of top joint

 

Oxxxx = 1955ish


Marigaux

from http://www.marigaux.com/english/

STRASSER MARIGAUX LEMAIRE
A short historic recalls...
Marigaux, a famous name, a renowned brand. Since now over 50 years the name Marigaux has been associated with those of the greatest oboe players, its reputation ever continuing to assert itself. At present Marigaux is a reference in the field of sound throughout the world.

The 12 January 1935, Strasser Marigaux was founded by three associates: Mr Strasser, Mr Marigaux and Mr Lemaire, hence the abbreviation of the current company SML. Strasser Marigaux began activity in Paris, 144 bd. de la Villette with the manufacture of saxophones and flutes. In parallel with this also began the making of oboes and clarinets at a workshop in the Couture Boussey, a town in the Eure already a well-known centre of French craftsmanship.

In 1975, Marigaux bought the company Malerne (in the Couture Boussey) and transferred their production into a more spacious factory.

In 1981 Strasser Marigaux abandoned the manufacture of all other intruments to devote itself entirely to the improvement of oboes and clarinets.

in 2001 Marigaux stopped production of Clarinets and now strictly produce Oboes.

RS Symphonie (information courtesy from Ben from Switzerland)

The Marigaux Symphonie was named after Roland Simoncini, former solo clarinetist of the Orchestre National de France, under whose guidance this clarinet has been designed. Unfortunately, Marigaux abandoned the clarinets sometime in 2003 and now concentrate on oboes and English horns.

This clarinet sports a number of unusual ergonomic features such as the roller keys on the right hand pinky keys' stack, an asymmetric register key, comfortable trill keys and a neatly designed "landing zone" for the left hand pinky.

 


Yamaha

Models Notes  
20 (plastic)    
22 (plastic)    
24 (plastic) SN example: 015762  
250 (plastic)    
26 II (plastic)  

SN Example: 128853

 
34 (wood)  

SN example: 005080A    and 006123  and 046107

pics from Junkdude.com

pic # 1
pic # 2
pic # 3
pic # 4

52    
     
450    
61 SN Example: 004019A  
82 982 era pics from Junkdude.com

pic # 1
pic # 2
pic # 3
pic # 4
pic # 5
pic # 6
pic # 7
 

CS-G  Custom   from ebay

pic # 1

CS-GH    

 

Alternative Keywork

Alternative Keywork Name Makers who Used / Years Pics / Notes
Mazzeo Selmer / mid 1960s

Each model, Selmer Paris, Signet and Bundy had slightly different features.

 

Selmer Mazzeo Clarinet Article
Mazzeo Brochure #1
Mazzeo Brochure #2

Mazzeo Mechanisms
The Mazzeo mechanism on the Signet allows the player to switch between "Mazzeo" mode and regular Boehm.  The first picture has a Bundy Mazzeo (on the bottom) and a Signet Mazzeo (on the top)




The Signet mechanism (left) shows it in the Mazzeo position.  It has a knurled end "plunger" mechanism to turn the Mazzeo system on/off.  To disconnect you simply push the mechanism in.  To reconnect you pull it out.

Mazzeo information, brochures and pictures provided by S. Page, UK

 
McIntyre Upper joint only from eBay

 

  Selmer

(this series 9 has a band on the top joint)

from eBay

1982 Clarinet prices

Instrument Manufacturer Model Description List Wholesale/Mail Order
Bb soprano Artley 17S Plastic 309 169
  Vito 7112 Resonite 305 171
  Armstrong 4001P Reso 310 176
  Artley 18-S-80 Reso w/bell ring 327 181
  King KG 1303 Reso 333 182
  Bundy 1400 Reso 309.50 182
  Evette 1990 (B10) Reso 309.50 184
  Buffet (1993 list) B-11 plastic 320 191
  Yamaha YCL24-II Comp 319 187
  Yamaha TCL26 Comp ABS plastic 339 199
  Conn 28S-80 'Henkin' machine lathed and bored, wood grain prof key mechanism 335 186
  Noblet V-40 Wood gain - non wood 389 221
  Artley 78-S-80 Wood Paris Prof 447 246
  Armstrong 4020W Wood Performance Model 449.50 264
  Signet 100 Wood intermediate model 449.50 264
  Normandy 4 Wood Paris Performance 472.50 269
  Evette 1993 (E-11) Wood Paris 459 274
  Signet 110 Wood intermediate model 449.50 292
  Noblet 40 Wood Paris Performance 575 338
  Signet 115 Wood Performance Model 575 369
  Noblet 45 Wood Paris Prof Artist 695 408
  Noblet (1993 List) 145 Special Value  (in 1993 list the 45 and 40 prices dropped) 675 395
  Buffet (1993 list) E-12   724 395
  Marigaux 245 Wood Paris Professional 474 409
  Evette 1101 (E-13) Wood Paris Professional 995 594
  Yamaha YCL-81 grenadilla 1190 695
  Yamaha YCL-82 grenadilla 1190 695
  Leblanc 1176 Wood Paris Prof Artist 1395 794
  Leblanc L-27 Symphonic Model 1395 794
  Selmer B-15-9 Wood Paris Prof Artist 1400 798
  Buffet R-13 Wood Paris Prof Artist 1395 820
  Marigaux 355 Wood Paris Prof 1518 829
  Leblanc L-200 Symphonic Model 1495 852
  Leblanc (1993 List) L-300   1225 695
  Selmer B-15-10S Wood Paris Prof Artist 1400 1050
Alto Clarinets King KG-1308 Reso 690 389
  Vito 7165 REso 570 427
  Bundy 1425 Reso 575 429
  Yamaha YCL-20 plastic 625 425
  Artley 18N Reso 790 474
  Marigaux 700 Wood Paris Professional 1188 769
  Noblet 60 Wood Paris 1501 1049
  Yamaha YCL-631, low Eb grenadilla 2400 1595
  Leblanc 420 Wood Paris 2160 1619
  Selmer 22 Wood Paris 2400 1800
Bass Clarinets King KG-1309 Reso 890 499
  Vito 7166P Reso 725 539
  Bundy 1430P Reso 725 543
  Yamaha (1983) YCL-220 plastic 795 549
  Vito 7168 Reso Eb key on body 920 568
  Artley 19N Reso 970 579
  Marigaux 750 Wood Paris Professional 1470 955
  Noblet 55 Wood Pars, 18 keys 1735 1214
  Noblet 5J, Low Eb   1835 1285
  Leblanc 400 Wood Paris, 18 keys 2700 2025
  Yamaha YCL-621, low Eb   2900 1945
  Selmer 30 Wood Pari,s 18 keys 2800 2100
  Buffet (1983) R-13   3108 2045
  Buffet (1983), Low C R-13   3991 2595
ContraBass Bundy 1440EEb Reso 995 746
  Vito 7181EEb Reso 1228 859
  Vito 7182BBb Reso 1810 1267
  Leblanc 342BBb all metal Paris, Low Eb 2304 1728
  Leblanc 340BBb All metal, Paris, Low C 4400 3299

Neat Clarinet Links

History of the Clarinet

http://www.niu.edu/user/u40gmb1/Cl_history.shtml

Nifty Acoustics Link

http://www.sfoxclarinets.com/baclac_art.htm

 

 

 


 


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